Category: trouble

On this day in music history: December 3, 1968 – “Elvis” (aka “The ‘68 Comeback Special”), airs on the NBC television network. Directed by Steve Binder (“The T.A.M.I. Show”), the special is a major turning point in Presley’s career. Having spent the majority of the 60’s making two to three films a year, Elvis had not performed in front of a live audience in over seven years. Scheduled to be aired during the Christmas holiday season, Elvis and his manager Colonel Tom Parker are ambitious to the make the show more than the singer performing Christmas carols. The program features him performing elaborate production numbers as well as in front of an intimate studio audience with members of his original 50’s era band. Initially, Presley is hesitant to performing in front of a live audience, but Binder reassures the singer and offer support. The special is both a major artistic triumph and a ratings blockbuster, setting the wheels in motion for Presley to re-establish his music career after nearly a decade of making movies that had tarnished the singers’ reputation both musically and image wise. In 2004, the three DVD box set “Elvis Presley – The ’68 Comeback Special Deluxe Edition” is released. The set contains the original broadcast version along with complete versions of the sit down performance sets with Presley’s original band, as well as previously unseen rehearsal and performance footage that does not make the original cut. To commemorate the 40th anniversary of the special’s original broadcast, RCA Records releases a eighty seven track four CD set titled “The Complete ’68 Comeback Special” containing the original twelve song soundtrack album, along with seventy five previously unreleased outtakes. To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the special’s original broadcast, RCA/Sony Legacy reissues it as a five CD + two Blu-ray box set on November 30, 2018.

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On this day in music history: October 3, 1981 – “Law And Order”, the first solo album by Lindsey Buckingham is released. Produced by Lindsey Buckingham and Richard Dashut, it is recorded at Larrabee Sound Studios and Wally Heider Studios in Hollywood, CA from January – July 1981. Following the release of Fleetwood Mac’s album “Tusk” and the extensive tour in support of it, guitarist Lindsey Buckingham turns his attention toward recording his first solo project. Signing a solo deal with Asylum Records in the US (Mercury Records internationally), enlists the assistance of Fleetwood Mac co-producer and engineer Richard Dashut to work on the album. Continuing in the same creative vein as “Tusk”, “Law And Order” features many of the eclectic nuances of that record, mixing them with catchy and accessible hooks. The album features the musician playing nearly all of the instruments himself, though band mates Mick Fleetwood and Christine McVie each appear on one track each, contributing drums and backing vocals respectively. The resulting album is greeted with a mixed response from fans and critics, calling it “scattershot” and “unfocused”, while alternately praising it for its excellent production, vocals and instrumentation throughout. It spins off two singles including the hooky and infectious “Trouble” (#9 Pop) (said to be inspired by Dashut) and “It Was I” (#110 Pop). Originally released on CD in 1984, the first “Target” label CD (pressed by Polygram’s pressing plant in Hanover, West Germany) released by Asylum becomes a sought after and collectible item by audiophiles, regarding it as having superior sound quality to the later Warner Bros reissue. “Law And Order” peaks at number thirty two on the Billboard Top 200.

Help support the Behind The Grooves music blog with a donation at: PayPal.Me/jharris1228

On this day in music history: December 3, 1968 – “Elvis” (aka “The ‘68 Comeback Special”), airs on the NBC television network. Directed by Steve Binder (“The T.A.M.I. Show”), the special is a major turning point in Presley’s career. Having spent the majority of the 60’s making two to three films a year, Elvis had not performed in front of a live audience in over seven years. Scheduled to be aired during the Christmas holiday season, Elvis and his manager Colonel Tom Parker are ambitious to the make the show more than the singer performing Christmas carols. The program features him performing elaborate production numbers as well as in front of an intimate studio audience with members of his original 50’s era band. Initially, Presley is hesitant to performing in front of a live audience, but Binder reassures the singer and offer support. The special is both a major artistic triumph and a ratings blockbuster, setting the wheels in motion for Presley to re-establish his music career after nearly a decade of making movies that had tarnished the singers’ reputation both musically and image wise. In 2004, the three DVD box set “Elvis Presley – The ’68 Comeback Special Deluxe Edition” is released. The set contains the original broadcast version along with complete versions of the sit down performance sets with Presley’s original band, as well as previously unseen rehearsal and performance footage that does not make the original cut. To commemorate the 40th anniversary of the special’s original broadcast, RCA Records releases a eighty seven track four CD set titled “The Complete ’68 Comeback Special” containing the original twelve song soundtrack album, along with seventy five previously unreleased outtakes. To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the special’s original broadcast, RCA/Sony Legacy reissues it as a five CD + two Blu-ray box set on November 30, 2018.

On this day in music history: October 3, 1981 – “Law And Order”, the first solo album by Lindsey Buckingham is released. Produced by Lindsey Buckingham and Richard Dashut, it is recorded at Larrabee Sound Studios and Wally Heider Studios in Hollywood, CA from January – July 1981. Following the release of Fleetwood Mac’s album “Tusk” and the extensive tour in support of it, guitarist Lindsey Buckingham turns his attention toward recording his first solo project. Signing a solo deal with Asylum Records in the US (Mercury Records internationally), enlists the assistance of Fleetwood Mac co-producer and engineer Richard Dashut to work on the album. Continuing in the same creative vein as “Tusk”, “Law And Order” features many of the eclectic nuances of that record, mixing them with catchy and accessible hooks. The album features the musician playing nearly all of the instruments himself, though band mates Mick Fleetwood and Christine McVie each appear on one track each, contributing drums and backing vocals respectively. The resulting album is greeted with a mixed response from fans and critics, calling it “scattershot” and “unfocused”, while alternately praising it for its excellent production, vocals and instrumentation throughout. It spins off two singles including the hooky and infectious “Trouble” (#9 Pop) (said to be inspired by Dashut) and “It Was I” (#110 Pop). Originally released on CD in 1984, the first “Target” label CD (pressed by Polygram’s pressing plant in Hanover, West Germany) released by Asylum becomes a sought after and collectible item by audiophiles, regarding it as having superior sound quality to the later Warner Bros reissue. “Law And Order” peaks at number thirty two on the Billboard Top 200.