Category: the temptations

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twixnmix:

Vintage Rock ‘N Roll and R&B Concert Posters

  1. American Legion Hall (Chattanooga, Tennessee) – July 4, 1951

  2. Memorial Auditorium (Chattanooga, Tennessee) – March 18, 1957

  3. Municipal Auditorium (Kansas City, Missouri) – November 10, 1957

  4. Memorial Auditorium (Chattanooga, Tennessee) – February 4, 1958

  5. Evergreen Ballroom (Olympia, Washington) – May 5, 1963
  6. Sunset Lake Park (Portsmouth, Virginia) – July 4, 1963
  7. Waco Coliseum (Waco, Texas) – March 18, 1965
  8. Civic Auditorium (Knoxville, Tennessee) – February 3, 1967

  9. Victory Stadium (Roanoke, Virginia) – June 26, 1968
  10. Civic Auditorium (Knoxville, Tennessee) – June 28, 1968 

Albums Released In 1969

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David Ruffin and

Tammi Terrell

After escaping an abusive relationship with James Brown, Tammi began a volatile relationship with David Ruffin, the lead singer of the Temptations, in 1965. In 1966, David surprised her with a marriage proposal.

However, when she announced their engagement on stage Davis became upset. Tammi was devastated once she discovered that he had a wife, three children and another girlfriend in Detroit. His drug use and infidelity led to them having public fights. Tammi was portrayed in the Temptations movie during the Motown picnic scene. It was claimed that

David

hit

Tammi

with a hammer or a machete, though this was denied by

Tammi’s family. Earl Van Dyke, leader of Motown’s Funk Brothers band, recalled seeing David beat up Tammi at the Motown

“Hitsville U.S.A.” headquarters. Her sister Ludie Montgomery also confirmed a story that David hit Tammi in the face with his motorcycle helmet, leading to the end of their relationship in 1967. Tammi went on to record classic duets with Marvin Gaye, but she unfortunately died from a brain tumor at the age of 24 in 1970. David died of a drug overdose in 1991.

Vintage Rock ‘N Roll and R&B Concert Posters

  1. American Legion Hall (Chattanooga, Tennessee) – July 4, 1951

  2. Memorial Auditorium (Chattanooga, Tennessee) – March 18, 1957

  3. Municipal Auditorium (Kansas City, Missouri) – November 10, 1957

  4. Memorial Auditorium (Chattanooga, Tennessee) – February 4, 1958

  5. Evergreen Ballroom (Olympia, Washington) – May 5, 1963
  6. Sunset Lake Park (Portsmouth, Virginia) – July 4, 1963
  7. Waco Coliseum (Waco, Texas) – March 18, 1965
  8. Civic Auditorium (Knoxville, Tennessee) – February 3, 1967

  9. Victory Stadium (Roanoke, Virginia) – June 26, 1968
  10. Civic Auditorium (Knoxville, Tennessee) – June 28, 1968 

twixnmix:

Vintage R&B Concert Posters

1. Memorial Auditorium (Chattanooga, Tennessee) – November 16, 1954

2. Memorial Auditorium (Chattanooga, Tennessee) – June 10, 1959

3. Oakland Auditorium (Oakland, California) – February 8, 1963

4. Exhibition Garden (Vancouver, B.C., Canada) – June 26, 1964

5. Wilmer’s Park (Brandywine, Maryland) – July 25, 1965

6. Veterans Memorial Auditorium (Columbus, Ohio) – October 25, 1965

7. Carr’s Beach (Annapolis, Maryland) – June 26, 1966

8. Civic Auditorium (Knoxville, Tennessee) – March 31, 1967

9. Shelby County Fairgrounds (Shelbina, Missouri) – July 27, 1968

10. Norfolk Arena (Norfolk, Virginia) – November 22, 1969

On this day in music history: December 2, 1972 – “Papa Was A Rollin’ Stone” by The Temptations hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 1 week, also peaking at #2 on the R&B singles chart on the same date. Written and produced by Norman Whitfield and Barrett Strong, it is the fourth and final number one pop single for the veteran Motown vocal group. The song is originally recorded by The Undisputed Truth (“Smiling Faces Sometimes”) in 1971 with their version peaking at #24 on the R&B singles chart and #63 on the Hot 100. When The Temptations hear the track for the first time, initially they are unhappy with the songs’ extended intro (the first vocal doesn’t begin until nearly four minutes into the LP version and nearly two minutes into the single version). The opening lyric (“It Was the third of September, that day I’ll always remember, yes I will. ‘Cause that was the day, that my daddy died.”) is particularly upsetting to lead singer Dennis Edwards. Though Edwards father died on the third of October (not the third of September as was the often repeated legend), it still hits a little too close to home. Ever the hard driving perfectionist in the studio, Whitfield has the group recut their vocals numerous times much to their annoyance, though it results in the performance captured on the finished record. The twelve minute long album track is edited down to just under seven minutes for single release. In spite of its length, the record is an across the board smash. “Papa Was A Rollin’ Stone” wins three Grammy Awards including Best R&B Vocal Performance By A Duo Or Group, Best R&B Instrumental Performance, and Best R&B Song in 1973. “Papa” is covered numerous times over the years including a version by musician Bill Wolfer in 1982 that features Michael Jackson on background vocals. George Michael also perform the song as part of a medley with Adamski and Seal’s song “Killer” in 1992 at the Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert and released on the EP “Five Live”. “Papa Was A Rollin’ Stone” is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: October 25, 1968 – “Cloud Nine” by The Temptations is released. Written by Norman Whitfield and Barrett Strong, it is the twenty fourth single release for the legendary Motown vocal quintet. After lead vocalist David Ruffin is fired from The Temptations in June of 1968, he is replaced by former Contours (“Do You Love Me?”, “First I Look At The Purse”) member Dennis Edwards. With the new addition, producer Norman Whitfield takes the opportunity to take the group in a new musical direction. Using the template of Sly & The Family Stone’s recent hit “Dance To The Music” (at the suggestion of Temptations leader Otis Williams), with its funky and driving back beat, along with the band’s unique habit of having several members taking a turn at lead vocals in the course of a song, inspired him to try something similar with the Tempts. Lyrically, “Cloud Nine” is different from anything previously released by Motown, with its narrative about being poor and disaffected, looking for an escape and release from that situation. The basic track for the song is cut at Golden World in Detroit (Motown Studio B) with members of The Funk Brothers on October 1, 1968. Whitfield also hires another young Detroit based guitarist named Dennis Coffey to play the signature wah wah guitar part on the song. Dubbed “psychedelic soul” by music critics and the public, the single marks the beginning of a new era for The Temptations, quickly racing up the R&B and pop charts immediately after its release. Issued in mono for the single release, the 45 mix of “Cloud Nine” differs significantly from its stereo counterpart. For The Tempts vocal coda at the songs conclusion, most of the instrumentation accept for the hi-hat cymbals drop out of the mix, as the group sings to the fade out. “Cloud Nine” peaks at #2 on the Billboard R&B singles chart and #6 on the Hot 100 in January of 1969. It also wins The Temptations a Grammy Award for Best Rhythm & Blues Group Performance, Vocal Or Instrumental in 1969, making them the first Motown artists to receive that honor. “Cloud Nine” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

Help support the Behind The Grooves music blog with a donation at: PayPal.Me/jharris1228

Vintage R&B Concert Posters

1. Memorial Auditorium (Chattanooga, Tennessee) – November 16, 1954

2. Memorial Auditorium (Chattanooga, Tennessee) – June 10, 1959

3. Oakland Auditorium (Oakland, California) – February 8, 1963

4. Exhibition Garden (Vancouver, B.C., Canada) – June 26, 1964

5. Wilmer’s Park (Brandywine, Maryland) – July 25, 1965

6. Veterans Memorial Auditorium (Columbus, Ohio) – October 25, 1965

7. Carr’s Beach (Annapolis, Maryland) – June 26, 1966

8. Civic Auditorium (Knoxville, Tennessee) – March 31, 1967

9. Shelby County Fairgrounds (Shelbina, Missouri) – July 27, 1968

10. Norfolk Arena (Norfolk, Virginia) – November 22, 1969