Category: the Supremes

On this day in music history: August 31, 1964 …

On this day in music history: August 31, 1964 – “Where Did Our Love Go”, the second album by The Supremes is released. Produced by Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier, Smokey Robinson, Norman Whitfield and Robert Gordy, it is recorded at Motown Studio A in Detroit, MI from December 28, 1962 – July 13, 1964. The album features singles by the group released during 1963-64 including their first top 40 pop hit “When The Lovelight Starts Shining Through His Eyes” (#23 Pop). It makes Billboard chart history when it becomes the first album to ever generate three number one pop singles (“Baby Love”, “Come See About Me” and the title track). It also spends an unprecedented 89 weeks on the Top 200, becoming Motown Records first album to sell over one million copies in the US. In 2004 to commemorate its 40th anniversary, Universal Music Group’s Hip-O Select label releases a 2 CD Deluxe Edition of the album featuring remastered versions of both the original stereo and first digital release of the long out of print mono version, along with outtakes and a complete live performance recorded at the Twenty Grand Club in Detroit. It quickly sells out of its limited pressing of 10,000 copies, turning it into a sought after collector’s item by Supremes fans. “Where Did Our Love Go” spends four weeks at number two on the Billboard Top 200, and one week at number one on the R&B album chart.

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On this day in music history: August 22, 1964 …

On this day in music history: August 22, 1964 – “Where Did Our Love Go?” by The Supremes hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 2 weeks. Written by Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier and Eddie Holland, it is the first chart topping single for the Detroit, MI based vocal trio. When Holland Dozier Holland write “Where Did Our Love Go?” in early 1964, the song is originally intended for and pitched to The Marvelettes who turn it down. The Supremes are initially not enamored of the song either, but record it anyway after string of failures which lead many around Motown to refer to the group as the “no hit Supremes”. Mary Wilson was to have sung it originally, but label founder has Diana Ross sing it instead. Initially, Ross is resistant to the idea, since she is asked to sing in a lower register than normal, but complies. The track is cut on April 8, 1964 in Motown’s Studio A in Detroit with The Funk Brothers providing musical support. Released on June 17, 1964, The Supremes along with numerous other acts tour the US as part of Dick Clark’s “American Bandstand Caravan Of Stars Tour”. They are bottom of the bill when the tour begins, and are unaware of the growing success of their record while on tour. Though the girls notice that the audience reaction to their performances grows in enthusiasm as the tour progresses. By the end of the tour, The Supremes are the headlining act, just the record is making its final ascent to the top. Entering the chart at #77 on July 11, 1964, it swiftly climbs to the top of the chart six weeks later. It is the first of twelve number one pop singles for The Supremes, making them the most successful American vocal group of not only the 1960’s, but of all time. While the group are on a tour of Europe in 1965, they film a promotional clip for “Where Did Our Love Go?” in Paris. The clip shows the girls lip synching the song while skipping through busy afternoon traffic on the Champs-Élysées. The video captures a real moment, where The Supremes are forced off of the streets by a French police officer. Not having secured permission to film, the girls are nearly arrested in the incident. “Where Did Our Love Go” is inducted into the Grammy Hall Of Fame in 1999. The single is also selected for preservation by the National Recording Registry of the Library Of Congress in 2016.

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Backstage The Top of the PopsThe Rolling Stone…

Backstage The Top of the Pops

The Rolling Stones (1964)

The Supremes (1965)

Ike & Tina Turner (1966)

Cher (1966)

Jimi Hendrix (1967)

Shirley Bassey (1968)

twixnmix: Diana Ross performing during her “Fo…

twixnmix:

Diana Ross performing during her “For One and For All” concert at Central Park in New York City on July 22, 1983.

On this day in music history: June 12, 1965 – …

On this day in music history: June 12, 1965 – “Back In My Arms Again” by The Supremes hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 1 week, also topping the R&B singles chart for 1 week on May 29, 1965. Written by Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier and Eddie Holland, it is the fifth pop and second R&B chart topper for the vocal trio from Detroit, MI. After being dubbed “the no-hit Supremes” by people at Motown, The Supremes finally grab the brass ring in August of 1964 when they land their first chart topping single with “Where Did Our Love Go?”. Three more number one singles (“Baby Love”, “Come See About Me”, and “Stop! In The Name Of Love”) follow in rapid succession. All are written by the songwriting and production team of Holland/Dozier/Holland, who continue their hot streak with the group. HDH come up with the idea for “Back In My Arms Again in November of 1964, also coming up with the idea of lead singer Diana Ross name checking her group mates Mary Wilson and Florence Ballard in the lyrics. Featuring The Funk Brothers providing the musical backing, the track is recorded at Motown’s Studio A in Detroit on December 1, 1964, with The Supremes overdubbing their vocals on February 24, 1965. Released on April 15, 1965, just five days after their previous single "Stop! In The Name Of Love” drops from the number one spot, “Back In My Arms Again” becomes another smash. The original mono single and stereo LP mixes of the song feature vocal performances that differ slightly from each other. Entering the Hot 100 at #68 on May 1, 1965, it streaks to the top of the chart six weeks later. It becomes the group’s fifth consecutive number one single, an unprecedented feat for an American group. This achievement puts The Supremes in rare company, as only The Beatles and the Bee Gees have had more consecutive chart toppers in the US, with six number ones each.

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On this day in music history: May 13, 1967 – “…

On this day in music history: May 13, 1967 – “The Happening” by The Supremes hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 1 week, also peaking at #12 on the R&B singles on May 20, 1967. Written by Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier, Eddie Holland and Frank De Vol, it is the tenth chart topping pop single for the Motown superstar trio. Less than two years after scoring their first number one single with “Where Did Our Love Go?”, The Supremes are in the middle of an unprecedented string of hits, that include nine chart topping singles on the Hot 100, and three on the R&B singles chart. In late 1966, Holland Dozier Holland are asked to write the title song to the film “The Happening starring Anthony Quinn. HDH collaborate on the song with film score composer Frank De Vol (“The Brady Bunch”, “My Three Sons”). Unlike the majority of The Supremes’ hits, it is recorded in Los Angeles, CA rather than in Detroit. The basic track is cut on the Columbia Pictures sound stage on February 24, 1967 with members of the Funk Brothers augmented by an orchestra conducted by De Vol. The Supremes record their vocals the following day on February 25, 1967. Released on March 20, 1967, just as their previous chart topper "Love Is Here And Now You’re Gone” falls from the top spot on the charts, “The Happening” is another instant hit. Entering the Hot 100 at #57 on April 8, 1967, it leaps to the top of the chart five weeks later. “The Happening” is the last single to be released before the group changes their name to Diana Ross & The Supremes, and also the last Supremes chart topper to feature Florence Ballard as a member. Unhappy with Diana Ross being pushed further into the spotlight, while herself and Mary Wilson are regulated to the background. Ballard becomes depressed, frequently missing performances and drinking heavily. Eventually, Flo is fired from The Supremes in July of 1967 and replaced by former Patti LaBelle & The Blue Belles vocalist Cindy Birdsong.

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twixnmix: The Supremes outside EMI headqu…

twixnmix:

The Supremes outside EMI

headquarters at 20 Manchester Square in London, October 1964.

twixnmix: The Supremes outside EMI headqu…

twixnmix:

The Supremes outside EMI

headquarters at 20 Manchester Square in London, October 1964.

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