Category: the Rolling Stones

twixnmix: The Rolling Stones at Green Park in…

twixnmix:

The Rolling Stones at Green Park in London for a press call on January 11, 1967. 

On this day in music history: June 11, 1966 – …

On this day in music history: June 11, 1966 – “Paint It Black” by The Rolling Stones hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 2 weeks. Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, it is the third US chart topper for the legendary British rock band fronted by lead singer Mick Jagger. Coming off of their most successful year to date, with The Rolling Stones scoring their first two US number one singles ((“I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” and “Get Off Of My Cloud”) and their first chart topping album (“Out Of Our Heads”), the band keep up their frenetic pace into 1966. When it is first written, “Paint It Black” is originally intended to be a “comedy track” with bassist Bill Wyman doing a parody of The Rolling Stones first manager Eric Easton, whose former job was working as a theater organist. Recorded at RCA Victor Studios in Hollywood, CA on March 6 – 9, 1966, it is cut during the sessions for the bands next album “Aftermath”. The song takes on a completely different tone when drummer Charlie Watts changes the basic rhythm and guitarist Brian Jones adds a sitar giving it its signature sound. Wyman also plays the bass pedals of an organ with his fists on the track. Released as a stand alone single in the UK (May 7, 1966 US, May 13, 1966 UK), the song is included on the US release of Aftermath (released on June 20, 1966), it becomes an immediate smash and one of the Stones best known songs. Entering the Hot 100 at #48 on May 14, 1966, it streaks to the top of the chart four weeks later. “Paint It Black” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: June 9, 1978 – &…

On this day in music history: June 9, 1978 – “Some Girls”, the sixteenth (fourteenth in the UK) studio album by The Rolling Stones is released. Produced by The Glimmer Twins, it is recorded at EMI Pathé Marconi Studios in Paris, France from October 10 – December 21, 1977, January 5 – March 2, 1978. Following the musical and cultural sea change that punk rock brings to popular music, The Rolling Stones are written off by much of the younger generation and many critics as “dinosaurs”. Not willing to take the criticism lying down, the band responds with what is regarded as one best albums of their career. The sessions are highly prolific, producing nearly thirty new songs with much of the unreleased material surfacing on later albums including “Emotional Rescue” and “Tattoo You”. Keith Richards potential long term incarceration for drug possession in Toronto, Canada the previous year also motivates the band to produce as much material as possible. The albums cover art designed by Peter Corriston features a die cut jacket with photos of Lucille Ball, Farrah Fawcett, Liza Minnelli, Raquel Welch, and Marilyn Monroe printed on the inner sleeve. It runs into legal trouble when all threaten to sue the band for unauthorized use of their likenesses. The cover is quickly revised and reissued with the photos covered up. A huge critical and commercial favorite upon its release, the album spins off three singles including “Miss You” (#1 Pop), “Beast Of Burden” (#8 Pop), and “Shattered” (#31 Pop). Remastered and reissued numerous times since making its CD debut in 1986, the album is remastered and reissued again in 2011. The reissues include a double CD set with the first disc featuring the original ten song album, with disc two including twelve bonus tracks of outtakes from the original sessions. It is also released as a numbered Super Deluxe edition with the aforementioned contents, plus a DVD including the music videos for “Miss You”, “Respectable”, “Far Away Eyes”, and three live performances from the Stones “Some Girls: Live In Texas ‘78” concert. The box also comes with a 100 page hardback book with extensive annotation and rare photos, a print of the band taken by famed photographer Helmut Newton, six postcards, a reproduction of the original LP promotional poster, and a 7" of “Beast Of Burden” b/w “When The Whip Comes Down”, with a replica of the original withdrawn picture sleeve. The vinyl LP is most recently remastered and reissued in 2018, as part of the box set “The Rolling Stones – Studio Album Vinyl Collection 1971 – 2016. "Some Girls” spends two weeks at number one on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 6x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: May 30, 1964 – &…

On this day in music history: May 30, 1964 – “England’s Newest Hit Makers”, the US debut album by The Rolling Stones is released. Produced by Andrew Loog Oldham, it is recorded at Regent Sound Studios in London from January 3 – February 25, 1964. Recorded in just five days worth of studio time spread over a six week period, the album features mostly R&B and blues covers the band has been performing as part of their live act. The US title of the album is amended from its original eponymous title, and includes the bands first two American singles “Not Fade Away” (#3 UK, #48 US Pop) and “Tell Me (You’re Coming Back”) (#24 US Pop). Original US pressings also include a color reproduction of the cover photo inserted inside the sleeve. Over time, these have become quite rare and are sought after collector’s items among Stones fans. The album is remastered and reissued a hybrid SACD (Super Audio Compact Disc) in 2002. Out of print on vinyl since the late 80’s, it is reissued as a 180 gram LP in 2003. This vinyl release has been supplanted by the mono reissue of the original UK album, included in the box set “The Rolling Stones In Mono” released in 2016. “England’s Newest Hit Makers” peaks at number eleven on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: May 29, 1971 – “…

On this day in music history: May 29, 1971 – “Brown Sugar” by The Rolling Stones hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 2 weeks. Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, it is sixth chart topping single for the legendary rock band from London, UK. By 1969, The Rolling Stones have righted their musical ship with the albums “Beggar’s Banquet” and “Let It Bleed”, after their ill fated psychedelic experiment “Their Satanic Majesties Request”. During this time, lead singer Mick Jagger makes his first foray into acting, starring as the notorious Australian outlaw “Ned Kelly”. While making the film, Jagger writes the song “Brown Sugar”. One of the main inspirations for the song is African American actress, model and singer Marsha Hunt, who is Mick’s girlfriend at the time. While together, the couple conceive a child, a girl named Karis who is born in November of 1970. Another paramour of Jagger’s who many believe that the song is about, is singer and former Ikette Claudia Linnear. With nearly all of the lyrics written by Jagger, the song’s good time feel and groove, masks its controversial subject matter, centering around “drugs and sex”. The master take of “Brown Sugar is recorded at Muscle Shoals Sound in Sheffield, AL on December 2 – 4, 1969. An alternate and much later released version is recorded at Olympic Studios in London on December 18, 1970, which features Al Kooper on piano and Eric Clapton on slide guitar. The song is held back from release for over a year, while The Stones extricate themselves from their management contract with Allen Klein and label Decca Records. Released in the UK on April 16, 1971 (and April 17, 1971 in the US), "Sugar” is the first release on the band’s newly formed Rolling Stones Records imprint distributed through Atlantic Records, and their forthcoming album “Sticky Fingers”. Entering the Hot 100 at #40 on May 1, 1971, it leaps to the top of the chart just four weeks later. The US release of the single includes the track “Bitch” as its B-side, with the UK single including the aforementioned track and a live cover version of the Chuck Berry classic “Let It Rock”. Long regarded as one of The Rolling Stones’ greatest songs, “Brown Sugar” is played frequently on the radio, and has been performed live on virtually every Stones tour since 1972. To commemorate its fortieth anniversary, a replica of the original UK 45 (w/ picture sleeve) is released on Record Store Day in 2011.

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twixnmix: The Rolling Stones during the “Betwe…

twixnmix:

The Rolling Stones during the “Between the Buttons” cover session at

Primrose Hill in London, 1966.

Photos by Gered Mankowitz

On this day in music history: May 24, 1968 – “…

On this day in music history: May 24, 1968 – “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” by The Rolling Stones is released (US release date is on June 1, 1968). Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, it is the eighteenth US (seventeenth UK) single by the iconic London based rock band fronted by lead vocalist Mick Jagger. In early 1968, Jagger is staying at band mate Keith Richards countryside home Redlands in West Wittering, Sussex, UK, while the pair are working on material for the next Rolling Stones album. Mick is awoken one morning by the sound of Richards’ gardener Jack Dyer walking past his window. When Mick asks who it is, Keith replies, “Oh that’s Jack, jumpin’ jack”. Jagger takes Richards statement, and is immediately inspired to begin writing lyrics. Keith comes up with main riff and chords that evolve into “Jumpin’ Jack Flash”, with the pair finishing the song quickly. The track is recorded at Olympic Studios in London on April 20, 1968 during sessions for the bands next album “Beggar’s Banquet”. Keith achieves the songs unique guitar sound by using a Gibson Hummingbird acoustic guitar tuned to an open D chord, then placing a capo on the neck. He then records the guitar (actually two guitars, with the second tuned to a higher octave) with a Philips cassette recorder using the players external condenser mic, then bouncing it back to multi-track tape. Issued as a stand alone single, “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” marks the Stones return to their trademark blues rooted sound after experimenting with psychedelic music on their two previous albums. In time, it is regarded as one of the bands greatest and most often covered songs. The single is backed with non-LP B-side “Child Of The Moon”. At the time of the singles release, it is accompanied by a promotional film directed by Michael Lindsey-Hogg (“Let It Be”), in which The Rolling Stones perform the song with all of the band members appearing with painted faces and heavy makeup. The songs title also becomes the basis of and major plot point of a Penny Marshall directed comedy in 1986 starring Whoopi Goldberg. Aretha Franklin records a cover of the song for the film, produced by Keith Richards, who also plays guitar on the track. The Rolling Stones original version of “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” hits number one on the UK singles chart, peaking at number three on the Billboard Hot 100 in July 1968, and is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: May 12, 1972 – &…

On this day in music history: May 12, 1972 – “Exile On Main Street”, the tenth (twelfth US) album by The Rolling Stones is released. Produced by Jimmy Miller, it is recorded at Olympic Studios in London, Sunset Sound Recorders in Hollywood, CA, Stargroves in Hampshire, UK, and Villa Nellcôte in Villefranche-sur-Mer, Côte d’Azur, France with The Rolling Stones Mobile Studio from June 1969 – March 1972. The bulk of the sessions take place at Olympic in London and Keith Richards villa on the French Riviera, though recording is long and arduous, hampered by Richards heroin use and unavailability of Mick Jagger and Bill Wyman at various times. Mixing various genres of music, critical and fan reaction is mixed initially. In time it is regarded as one of the bands greatest works. It spins off two singles including “Tumbling Dice” (#7 Pop) and “Happy” (#22 Pop). The original vinyl LP package comes with a perforated sheet with twelve postcards featuring pictures taken by photographer Norman Seeff. In May of 2010, the album is remastered and reissued on CD, including a bonus disc with ten additional tracks including the previously unreleased “Plundered My Soul” which is issued as a limited edition 7" for Record Store Day in April of 2010. The most recent vinyl reissue is released in 2016, half speed mastered and pressed on 180 gram vinyl. The release faithfully reproduces the original LP packaging, including the postcards and custom inner sleeves. Also comes with an outer OBI strip with the track listing, and stating the LP set is an audiophile half speed remaster. In and out of print on vinyl since its original release, it is remastered and reissued as a double 180 gram LP set in 2016. It is also included in the box set “The Rolling Stones – Studio Albums Vinyl Collection 1971 – 2016”, release in June of 2018. “Exile On Main Street” spends two weeks at number one on the UK album chart, four weeks at number one on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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twixnmix: The Rolling Stones performing at…

twixnmix:

The Rolling Stones performing at the Hollywood Bowl on July 25, 1966.  

Photos by Bruce McBroom

On this day in music history: April 23, 1976 -…

On this day in music history: April 23, 1976 – “Black And Blue”, the thirteenth (fifteenth in the US) album by The Rolling Stones is released. Produced by The Glimmer Twins (Mick Jagger & Keith Richards), it is recorded at Musicland Studios in Munich, Germany and with The Rolling Stones Mobile Studio in Rotterdam, NL, Mountain Studios in Montreaux, Switzerland, and Atlantic Studios in New York City from December 1974 – February 1976. Recorded during numerous sessions held over a year and a half, The Stones begin by recording in Munich (where their previous album “It’s Only Rock & Roll” had been recorded), continue the sessions in The Netherlands, Switzerland, and concluding in the US. Much of the recording takes place while the band are searching for a replacement for guitarist Mick Taylor who had quit in late 1974. The Stones finally settle on former Faces guitarist Ron Wood who officially joins in 1975. It spins off two singles including “Fool To Cry” (#10 Pop) and “Hot Stuff” (#49 Pop). Originally released on CD in 1986, it is first remastered and reissued in 1994, and is subsequently reissued in 2005, 2009 and in Japan in 2014 as a hi-rez SACD. In and out of print on vinyl since its original release, it is most recently issued as a 180 gram LP in 2018, as part of the box set “The Rolling Stones – Studio Albums Vinyl Collection (1971 – 2016). "Black And Blue” spends four weeks (non-consecutive) at number one on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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