Category: television

Actor and comedian Tim Conway (born Thomas D…

Actor and comedian Tim Conway (born Thomas Daniel Conway in Willoughby, OH) – December 15, 1933 – May 14, 2019, RIP

Actress, model and singer Peggy Lipton (born…

Actress, model and singer Peggy Lipton (born Margaret Ann Lipton in Los Angeles, CA) – August 30, 1946 – May 11, 2019, RIP

Director, screenwriter and producer John Sin…

Director, screenwriter and producer John Singleton (born John Daniel Singleton in Los Angeles, CA) – January 6, 1968 – April 29, 2019, RIP

On this day in music history: March 26, 1955 -…

On this day in music history: March 26, 1955 – “The Ballad Of Davy Crockett” by Bill Hayes hits #1 on the Billboard Best Sellers chart for 5 weeks. Written by George Bruns and Thomas W. Blackburn, it is the biggest hit for the singer and actor from Harvey, IL. The song is written as the theme for the hit TV mini series starring Fess Parker and Buddy Ebsen and produced by Walt Disney Productions. The song and the television show become instant pop cultural phenomenons. Its popularity is so great that it inspires numerous cover versions after Hayes’ hits the charts by Tennessee Ernie Ford, Mac Wiseman, jazz singer Ella Fitzgerald and Davy Crockett star Fess Parker. At the time that Hayes’ version of the song is on the charts there are two other competing versions of “The Ballad Of Davy Crockett” in the Top 30 at the same time. Actor Fess Parker records his own version of the song, released by Columbia Records in the Spring of 1955, peaking at #5 on the Best Sellers chart on May 21, 1955. Bill Hayes’ original version of “The Ballad Of Davy Crockett” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

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Television actor Luke Perry (Beverly Hills 9…

Television actor Luke Perry (Beverly Hills 90210, Riverdale) (born Coy Luther Perry III in Mansfield, OH) – October 11, 1966 – March 4, 2019, RIP

TV Guide Covers – 1972

TV Guide Covers – 1972

Actor, writer and producer Bob Einstein (bor…

Actor, writer and producer Bob Einstein (born Stewart Robert Einstein in Los Angeles, CA) – November 20, 1942 – January 2, 2019, RIP

Oscar and Grammy Award winning lyricist Norm…

Oscar and Grammy Award winning lyricist Norman Gimbel (born in Brooklyn, NY) – November 16, 1927 – December 19, 2018, RIP

Actress and director Penny Marshall (born Ca…

Actress and director Penny Marshall (born Carole Penny Marshall in The Bronx, NY) – October 15, 1943 – December 17, 2018, RIP

On this day in music history: December 13, 196…

On this day in music history: December 13, 1968 – “We’re The Banana Splits”, the lone album by The Banana Splits is released. Produced by David Mook, it is recorded at Gold Star Studios in Hollywood, CA in Early – Mid 1968. Created by TV cartoon kings William Hanna and Joseph Barbera, The Banana Splits is conceived as an hour long live action Saturday morning TV show. Hanna Barbera approach puppeteers Sid and Marty Krofft to design costumes for the characters who are to be the hosts of the program. Basing the show’s format on the hit comedy variety series “Laugh-In”, The Krofft Brothers work with the Hanna Barbera team to come up with the characters Fleegle (voiced by Paul Winchell), Bingo (voiced by Daws Butler), Drooper (voiced by Allan Melvin) and Snorky (voiced with sound effects). Also wanting to incorporate music into the show, they hire David Mook and Ted Nichols. Music publisher Aaron Schroeder assembles a team to write original songs. Contributors include former Blood, Sweat & Tears lead vocalist Al Kooper (“You’re The Lovin’ End”), Joey Levine (“I Enjoy Being A Boy”, “It’s A Good Day For A Parade”), Gene Pitney (“Two Ton Tessie”), and a then unknown Barry White (“Doin’ The Banana Split”). Utilizing studio musicians and session singers, another vocalist is Ricky Lancelotti (aka “Rick Lancelot”) who sings the lead vocal on White’s “Doin’ The Banana Split”. Lancelotti goes on to greater fame singing with Frank Zappa. As series hits the air, Decca Records releases “Wait Till Tomorrow” b/w “We’re The Banana Splits”, which fails to chart when it receives virtually no promotion or radio play. The album is released in mid December of 1968, three months after making its network debut on NBC on September 7, 1968. The show’s theme song “The Tra La La Song (One Banana, Two Banana)” (#96 Pop) is the follow up, but only scrapes the bottom of the chart before fading from view. The album has a similar fate, though show sponsor Kellogg’s also issues two extended 45 EP’s as mail order premiums during 1969. A third single “Long Live Love” is released in August of 1969, but when it also flops, plans for a second album are scrapped. The series lasts on NBC until September of 1970, but enjoys major popularity in syndicated re-runs over the next three decades. Over time, the music from The Banana Splits enjoys a cult following, turning the album which had been regulated to the cut out bin, into a heavily sought after and high priced collector’s item. So much so that bootleg copies of the LP begin to flood the market in the 90’s. It is even bootlegged on CD after Liz Phair & Material Issue cover “The Tra La La Song” for the tribute album “Saturday Morning: Cartoons’ Greatest Hits”, previously being covered by the punk rock band The Dickies in 1978. To date, “We’re The Banana Splits” has yet to be legitimately reissued since it is owned by Hanna Barbera’s owner Warner Bros.