Category: talking heads

On this day in music history: August 3, 1979 -…

On this day in music history: August 3, 1979 – “Fear Of Music”, the third album by Talking Heads is released. Produced by Talking Heads and Brian Eno, it is recorded at Chris and Tina’s Loft, The Hit Factory, and Atlantic Studios in New York City from April – May 1979. Recorded in just three weeks, mostly in Chris Frantz and Tina Weymouth’s New York City loft, with The Record Plant’s mobile recording truck, they expand on the sound of their previous album “More Songs About Buildings And Food”, incorporating more dance oriented rhythms along with David Byrne’s eclectic lyrics and vocals featured front and center. The album’s cover art features a matte black cover with a metal diamond plate floor pattern embossed on the front and back with the band name and title printed in green ink. The initial idea was to make the LP jacket out of a plastic material, but when that proves to be too expensive, the artwork is printed on regular cardboard paper stock. It spin off two singles including “Life During Wartime” (#80 Pop) and “I Zimbra”. Originally released on CD in the mid 80’s, it is remastered and reissued in 2006 as a hybrid DualDisc featuring four additional bonus tracks. The DVD side features the album remixed into 5.1 surround sound, and also contains the videos for “Cities” and “I Zimbra”. It is also reissued as a 180 gram vinyl LP by Rhino Records in 2013. The same year, a limited pressing on marbled green vinyl (500 copies only) sold exclusively through Boston based record store Newbury Comics. “Fear Of Music” peaks at number twenty one on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

Help support the Behind The Grooves music blog with a donation at: PayPal.Me/jharris1228

On this day in music history: June 10, 1985 – …

On this day in music history: June 10, 1985 – “Little Creatures”, the sixth album by Talking Heads is released. Produced by Talking Heads, it is recorded at Sigma Sound Studios in New York City from October 1984 – March 1985. Following the tour in support of “Speaking In Tongues”, Talking Heads spend much of 1984 writing and rehearsing material for their next studio album. For their next project, the band work with engineer Eric “E.T. Thorngren after mixing the audio for their live concert film and album "Stop Making Sense”. Recorded under the working titles of “Wild Infancy” and “In Defense Of Television, "Little Creatures” marks a shift away from the polyrhythmic sound of the previous album and its predecessors “Remain In Light” and “Fear Of Music”, instead writing material that explores elements of country music and Americana. The albums colorful and idiosyncratic artwork is illustrated by artist Howard Finster, a Baptist minister from Georgia who has also painted the cover art for R.E.M.’s second album “Reckoning. "Creatures” is another critical and commercial success for Talking Heads, becoming their best selling studio album. It spins off two singles including “Road To Nowhere” (#105 Pop) and “And She Was” (#54 Pop). The album is remastered and reissued in 2005 as a DualDisc CD with the standard stereo redbook CD on one side, and a DVD-A side with a 5.1 surround mix of the album as well as the music videos for “Road To Nowhere” and “And She Was”. To date, the album was last reissued on vinyl by Simply Vinyl in 1999, and is currently out of print. “Little Creatures” peaks at number twenty on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 2x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

Help support the Behind The Grooves music blog with a donation by clicking on the link at: PayPal.Me/jharris1228

On this day in music history: May 31, 1983 – &…

On this day in music history: May 31, 1983 – “Speaking In Tongues”, the fifth studio album by Talking Heads is released. Produced by Talking Heads, it is recorded at Blank Tapes Studios, Sigma Sound Studios in New York City and Compass Point Studios in Nassau, The Bahamas from July 1982 – February 1983. Their first album of new studio material since “Remain In Light” three years earlier, the band create their most accessible and commercially successful album. It spins off two singles including their biggest hit “Burning Down The House” (#9 Pop) and “This Must Be The Place (Naive Melody)” (#62 Pop). “Tongues” is also supported by their largest tour to date, which also produces the live concert film and album “Stop Making Sense” in 1984. Pop Artist Robert Rauschenberg wins a Grammy Award (for Best Album Package) for the limited edition LP package which includes a clear vinyl LP (with three additional clear plastic discs with collages printed on each) housed in a clear plastic cover. The original cassette version of the album contains longer versions of the tracks “I Get Wild/Wild Gravity”, “Slippery People”, “Girlfriend Is Better”, “Moon Rocks” and “Making Flippy Floppy” that were edited for time to fit on a single LP. In 2006, a remastered DualDisc CD of the album is issued including the longer versions of the songs from the cassette release, along two additional bonus tracks. The second side of the disc is a DVD-A featuring high resolution stereo and 5.1 surround mixes of the album and the music videos for “Burning Down The House” and “This Must Be The Place (Naive Melody)”. In 2009, the album is also issued as a limited edition SHM-CD, replicating the Rauschenberg designed packaging in mini-LP form. Out of print on vinyl since 1989, it is remastered and reissued as a 180 gram LP by Rhino Records in 2013. “Speaking In Tongues” peaks at number fifteen on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

Help support the Behind The Grooves music blog with a donation by clicking on the link at: PayPal.Me/jharris1228

On this day in music history: March 24, 1982 -…

On this day in music history: March 24, 1982 – “The Name Of This Band Is Talking Heads”, the fifth album by Talking Heads is released. Produced by Talking Heads, it is recorded at WCOZ Northern Studio in Maynard, MA on November 17, 1977, The Park West in Chicago, IL on August 23, 1978, The Boarding House in San Francisco, CA on September 16, 1978, The Agora in Cleveland, OH on December 18, 1978, Berklee Performance Center in Boston, MA on August 24, 1979, The Capitol Theater in Passaic, NJ on November 17, 1979, Central Park in New York City on August 27, 1980, Emerald City in Cherry Hill, NJ on November 8 & 9, 1980, Sun Plaza Concert Hall in Tokyo, Japan on February 27, 1981. The seventeen track double album features live performances by Talking Heads recorded between November 1977 and February 1981, with half of the album featuring the main four piece band. The second half features the band expanded to a ten piece with guest musicians including Adrian Belew (guitar), Bernie Worrell (keyboards), Dolette McDonald and Nona Hendryx (background vocals). The cassette version of the album includes the song “Cities” as a bonus track. In 2004, an expanded reissue nearly doubles the length of the original album by adding additional tracks left off the original LP, and ones that were shortened due to the time constraints of the vinyl format. Out of print on vinyl since its initial release, the original edited release is remastered and reissued as a 180 gram double vinyl pressing in 2013. It is also pressed on maroon colored vinyl, limited to 1,000 copies and is issued as an exclusive, though the Newbury Comics record store chain. “The Name Of This Band Is Talking Heads” peaks at number thirty one on the Billboard Top 200.

Help support the Behind The Grooves music blog with a donation by clicking on the link at: PayPal.Me/jharris1228

On this day in music history: November 4, 1978…

On this day in music history: November 4, 1978 – “Take Me To The River” by Talking Heads is released. Written by Al Green and Mabon “Teenie” Hodges, it is the first US top 40 single for the New York based band. Issued as the first single from their second album “More Songs About Buildings And Food”, the song was co-written and originally recorded by Al Green on his album “Al Green Explores Your Mind” in 1974. Green’s version was not released as a single at the time, and another version by his label mate Syl Johnson is released in 1975, hitting #7 on the R&B singles chart and #48 on the Hot 100. David Bryne hears Al Green’s original version, and be intrigued by the songs mixture of gospel flavored spirituality and implied sexuality, and suggests to his bandmates that they record it. Talking Heads version produced by the band and Brian Eno, is recorded in mid 1978. Their version peaks at #26 on the Billboard Hot 100 on February 10, 1979, becoming their first major hit and a staple of their live performances.

On this day in music history: October 8, 1980 …

On this day in music history: October 8, 1980 – “Remain In Light”, the fourth album by Talking Heads is released. Produced by Brian Eno, it is recorded at Compass Point Studios in The Bahamas and Sigma Sound Studios in New York City from July – August 1980. The bands third and final collaboration with producer Brian Eno, many of the albums songs are inspired by experiments with African polyrhythms and recording the basic tracks in pieces then looping and editing the final results. Talking Heads also bring in outside musicians such as King Crimson guitarist Adrian Belew and singer Nona Hendryx. The final product is a genre defying and innovative work that receives great praise from fans and critics alike. The albums distinctive cover artwork, features photos of the four band members with red computer rendered masks obscuring their faces (except for their eyes, noses, and mouths). The design is created by drummer Chris Frantz and bassist Tina Weymouth in cooperation with Walter Bender from MIT (Massachusetts Institute Of Technology). The process involved in creating the computer generated rendering, proves to be very arduous and time consuming, due to the limited amount of computer memory available. It spins off two singles including the classic “Once In A Lifetime” (#103 Pop). In 2006, the album is remastered and reissued with four unfinished outtakes from the original recording sessions in 2006. The same year, it is also reissued as a 180 gram vinyl LP by Rhino Records. “Remain In Light” peaks at number nineteen on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: September 16, 19…

On this day in music history: September 16, 1977 – “Talking Heads: 77”, the debut album by Talking Heads is released. Produced by Talking Heads with Tony Bongiovi and Lance Quinn, it is recorded at Sundragon Studios in New York City from Late 1976 – Mid 1977. The band’s first album contains several songs were written during the bands’ residency at the legendary punk rock club CBGB’s in New York City. The single “Psycho Killer” (#92 Pop) becomes one of their signature tunes and one of their most enduring. The album is remastered and reissued as a DualDisc CD in 2005 with one side featuring a standard redbook CD with five bonus tracks, and the other side containing a DVD-A (DVD Audio) version of the album with the original stereo mix and a high definition 5.1 Surround mix (remixed by E.T. Thorngren and Jerry Harrison), with two live performance videos of the band performing “Pulled Up” (Live at Sproul Plaza in Berkeley, CA in 1978) and “I Feel It In My Heart” (Live at The Kitchen in New York City in 1976). It is also reissued as a 180g LP on Record Store Day in April of 2009, making it available on vinyl for the first time in over twenty years. “Talking Heads: 77” peaks at number ninety seven on the Billboard Top 200.

On this day in music history: September 12, 19…

On this day in music history: September 12, 1984 – “Stop Making Sense”, the seventh album by Talking Heads is released. Produced by Gary Goetzman, it is recorded at The Pantages Theatre in Hollywood, CA in December 1983. Recorded during the tour in support of the bands then current album “Speaking In Tongues”, the album is issued as the companion piece to the live concert film directed by Jonathan Demme (“The Silence Of The Lambs”, “Philadelphia”). Talking Heads main line up is augmented with additional musicians including Bernie Worrell (keyboards), Alex Weir (guitar), Lynn Mabry and Ednah Holt (backing vocals). The original LP release contains only nine songs and is heavily edited in order to fit it on one album, and also comes wrapped in a full color picture book. A second variant of the LP package is released along with the standard release. The limited edition version is printed without the torso photo of David Byrne on front and instead is stark white, with the graphics in black print. It also comes with a twenty page booklet with photos and storyboard sketches by Byrne created for the staging of the concert. In 1999, a remastered and expanded edition of the album is released featuring the complete performance, matching the contents of the fifteenth anniversary theatrical re-release of the film. “Stop Making Sense” peaks at number forty one on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 2x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: August 3, 1979 -…

On this day in music history: August 3, 1979 – “Fear Of Music”, the third album by Talking Heads is released. Produced by Talking Heads and Brian Eno, it is recorded at Chris and Tina’s Loft, The Hit Factory, and Atlantic Studios in New York City from April – May 1979. Recorded in just three weeks, mostly in Chris Frantz and Tina Weymouth’s New York City loft, with The Record Plant’s mobile recording truck, they expand on the sound of their previous album “More Songs About Buildings And Food”, incorporating more dance oriented rhythms along with David Byrne’s eclectic lyrics and vocals featured front and center. The album’s cover art features a matte black cover with a metal diamond plate floor pattern embossed on the front and back with the band name and title printed in green ink. The initial idea was to make the LP jacket out of a plastic material, but when that proves to be too expensive, the artwork is printed on regular cardboard paper stock. It spin off two singles including “Life During Wartime” (#80 Pop) and “I Zimbra”. Originally released on CD in the mid 80’s, it is remastered and reissued in 2006 as a hybrid DualDisc featuring four additional bonus tracks. The DVD side features the album remixed into 5.1 surround sound, and also contains the videos for “Cities” and “I Zimbra”. It is also reissued as a 180 gram vinyl LP by Rhino Records in 2013. The same year, a limited pressing on marbled green vinyl (500 copies only) sold exclusively through Boston based record store Newbury Comics. “Fear Of Music” peaks at number twenty one on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: June 10, 1985 – …

On this day in music history: June 10, 1985 – “Little Creatures”, the sixth album by Talking Heads is released. Produced by Talking Heads, it is recorded at Sigma Sound Studios in New York City from October 1984 – March 1985. Following the tour in support of “Speaking In Tongues”, Talking Heads spend much of 1984 writing and rehearsing material for their next studio album. For their next project, the band work with engineer Eric “E.T. Thorngren after mixing the audio for their live concert film and album "Stop Making Sense”. Recorded under the working titles of “Wild Infancy” and “In Defense Of Television, "Little Creatures” marks a shift away from the polyrhythmic sound of the previous album and its predecessors “Remain In Light” and “Fear Of Music”, instead writing material that explores elements of country music and Americana. The albums colorful and idiosyncratic artwork is illustrated by artist Howard Finster, a Baptist minister from Georgia who has also painted the cover art for R.E.M.’s second album “Reckoning. "Creatures” is another critical and commercial success for Talking Heads, becoming their best selling studio album. It spins off two singles including “Road To Nowhere” (#105 Pop) and “And She Was” (#54 Pop). The album is remastered and reissued in 2005 as a DualDisc CD with the standard stereo redbook CD on one side, and a DVD-A side with a 5.1 surround mix of the album as well as the music videos for “Road To Nowhere” and “And She Was”. “Little Creatures” peaks at number twenty on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 2x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.