Category: shirley bassey

Albums Released In 1971

twixnmix:

Backstage The Top of the Pops

  1. The Rolling Stones (1964)
  2. The Supremes (1965)
  3. Ike & Tina Turner (1966)
  4. Cher (1966)
  5. Jimi Hendrix (1967)
  6. Shirley Bassey (1968)

twixnmix:

Backstage The Top of the Pops

The Rolling Stones (1964)

The Supremes (1965)

Ike & Tina Turner (1966)

Cher (1966)

Jimi Hendrix (1967)

Shirley Bassey (1968)

dollsofthe1960s:

The wedding of Shirley Bassey and Sergio Novak in Las Vegas, Nevada on August 12, 1968.

Backstage The Top of the Pops

The Rolling Stones (1964)

The Supremes (1965)

Ike & Tina Turner (1966)

Cher (1966)

Jimi Hendrix (1967)

Shirley Bassey (1968)

Born on this day: January 8, 1937 – Welsh pop music icon Dame Shirley Bassey (born Shirley Veronica Bassey in Tiger Bay, Cardiff, Wales, UK). Happy 82nd Birthday, Dame Shirley!!

On this day in music history: December 21, 1964 – “Goldfinger” by Shirley Bassey is released. Written by John Barry, Anthony Newley and Leslie Bricusse, it is the biggest hit for the pop vocalist from Tiger Bay, Cardiff, Wales. While production of the third James Bond film “Goldfinger” is underway in the Spring of 1964, score composer John Barry is given an idea of what is required for the films’ theme song by director Guy Hamilton as a “gritty and tough song”, something along the lines of the standard “Mack The Knife”. Barry relates this to lyricists Anthony Newley and Leslie Bricusse, along with a brief description of the plot. The pair come up with the lyric, “Goldfinger, wider than a mile”. Initially Barry is not impressed, but changes his mind they also write the line “he’s the man with the midas touch”, alluding to the scene in the film where Goldfinger’s assistant Jill Masterson is killed for betraying her boss, by covering her body in gold paint. Newley and Bricusse finish writing the lyrics to Barry’s music over the next few days before going into the studio to record a demo. The demo recording featuring Anthony Newley’s vocals is recorded on May 14, 1964 and is completed in two takes. John Barry handpicks singer Shirley Bassey to sing the theme. The final version of “Goldfinger” is recorded on August 20, 1964 at CTS Studios in London. Wearing a restricting bustier under her clothes, Bassey steps behind a acoustical screen, and removes the garment enabling her to breathe easier when reaching for the songs’ high notes. The singer holds the climatic final note for so long, that she nearly passes out in the process. The theme for “Goldfinger” is nearly removed from the film when film producer Harry Saltzman expresses his dislike of it. But he is overruled by co-producer Albert “Cubby” Broccoli who loves it, and the deadline for the films’ world premiere in London the following month do not allow time to write another song. Set against the electrifying opening title sequence of the film, “Goldfinger” becomes instantly iconic, setting the pattern for the Bond films using pop vocalists to perform the title songs. Entering the Hot 100 at #98 on January 30, 1965, it peaks at #8 on March 27, 1965, selling over a million copies in the US. At the time the original version is climbing the charts, three instrumental cover versions by guitarist Billy Strange (#55 Pop), keyboardist and bandleader Jack La Forge (#96 Pop) and composer John Barry (#72 Pop) place on the charts. Most surprisingly, “Goldfinger” is passed over for an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Song, not making the cut of the final five nominees selected that year. However, the songs’ popularity has been enduring, being covered numerous times by various artists including Count Basie, Ray Barretto, Enoch Light, Billy Preston and Magazine. Shirley Bassey’s original recording of “Goldfinger” is inducted into the Grammy Hall Of Fame in 2008.  

Born on this day: January 8, 1937 – Welsh pop music icon Dame Shirley Bassey (born Shirley Veronica Bassey in Tiger Bay, Cardiff, Wales, UK). Happy 81st Birthday, Dame Shirley!!

On this day in music history: December 21, 1964 – “Goldfinger” by Shirley Bassey is released. Written by John Barry, Anthony Newley and Leslie Bricusse, it is the biggest hit for the pop vocalist from Tiger Bay, Cardiff, Wales. While production of the third James Bond film “Goldfinger” is underway in the Spring of 1964, score composer John Barry is given an idea of what is required for the films’ theme song by director Guy Hamilton as a “gritty and tough song” something along the lines of the standard “Mack The Knife”. Barry relates this to lyricists Anthony Newley and Leslie Bricusse, along with a brief description of the plot. The pair come up with the lyric, “Goldfinger, wider than a mile”. Initially Barry is not impressed, but changes his mind they also write the line “he’s the man with the midas touch”, alluding to the scene in the film where Goldfinger’s assistant Jill Masterson is killed for betraying her boss by covering her body in gold paint. Newley and Bricusse finish writing the lyrics to Barry’s music over the next few days before going into the studio to record a demo. The demo recording featuring Anthony Newley’s vocals is recorded on May 14, 1964 and is completed in two takes. John Barry handpicks singer Shirley Bassey to sing the theme. The final version of “Goldfinger” is recorded on August 20, 1964 at CTS Studios in London. Wearing a restricting bustier under her clothes, Bassey steps behind a acoustical screen, and removes the garment enabling her to breathe easier when reaching for the songs’ high notes. The singer holds the climatic final note for so long, that she nearly passes out in the process. The theme for “Goldfinger” is nearly removed from the film when film producer Harry Saltzman expresses his dislike of it. But he is overruled by co-producer Albert “Cubby” Broccoli who loves it, and the deadline for the films’ world premiere in London the following month do not allow time to write another song. Set against the electrifying opening title sequence of the film, “Goldfinger” becomes instantly iconic, setting the pattern for the Bond films using pop vocalists to perform the title songs. Entering the Hot 100 at #98 on January 30, 1965, it peaks at #8 on March 27, 1965, selling over a million copies in the US. At the time the original version is climbing the charts, three instrumental cover versions by guitarist Billy Strange (#55 Pop), keyboardist and bandleader Jack La Forge (#96 Pop) and composer John Barry (#72 Pop) place on the charts. Most surprisingly, “Goldfinger” is passed over for an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Song, not making the cut of the final five nominees selected that year. However, the songs’ popularity has been enduring, being covered numerous times by various artists including Count Basie, Ray Barretto, Enoch Light, Billy Preston and Magazine. Shirley Bassey’s original recording of “Goldfinger” is inducted into the Grammy Hall Of Fame in 2008.