Category: ringo starr

The Beatles during the filming of Help! (196…

The Beatles during the filming of Help! (1965)

On this day in music history: April 27, 1981 -…

On this day in music history: April 27, 1981 – Drummer Ringo Starr marries actress Barbara Bach at the Marylebone Registars Office in London. The two meet each other during the filming of the comedy “Caveman” in Mexico the year before. Starr’s former Beatle band mates Paul McCartney and George Harrison and close friend Harry Nilsson attend the ceremony with their families. Happy 38th Anniversary Ringo and Barbara!!

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The Beatles on the set of Help! (1965)

The Beatles on the set of Help! (1965)

On this day in music history: April 16, 1971 -…

On this day in music history: April 16, 1971 – “It Don’t Come Easy” by Ringo Starr is released (UK release date is on April 9, 1971). Written by Richard Starkey, it is the second solo single by the former Beatle drummer. Less than three weeks prior to the official announcement that The Beatles are breaking up, Ringo Starr issues his first solo release, the pop standards album “Sentimental Journey”. Before sessions wrap on that album, Ringo writes “It Don’t Come Easy” (originally titled “You Gotta Pay Your Dues”) with assistance from his band mate George Harrison, though does not take a co-writing credit. The first recording of the track with George Martin producing takes place in Studio Two at Abbey Road Studios on February 18, 1970, with Ringo on drums, Harrison on acoustic and electric guitars, Klaus Voorman on bass and Stephen Stills (who happens to be present at the session) on piano. The band run through twenty takes of “Easy”, before another ten with take thirty being considered the best. The first version is shelved when Ringo feels that it can be improved upon and to this day remains unreleased. On March 8, 1970, they record a re-make of “It Don’t Come Easy” at Trident Studios in London, this time with George Harrison handling the production duties. The second recording session features the same musicians, plus Ron Cattermole (saxophone, trumpet) and long time Beatles roadie Mal Evans playing tambourine. The basic track is cut, with further overdubs recorded the following day. After this, the song is still unfinished, and the recording does not resume again until final overdubs and mixing are completed in October of 1970. During the final sessions for “Easy”, the B-side “Early 1970” is recorded. Also written by Starr, the song is the drummer’s account of The Beatles after they split, expressing his hope that he’ll see his mates and play music with them again. With Ringo’s second album, the country and western flavored “Beaucoups Of Blues” being released in late September of 1970, the two songs are held back for release until after the new year. Issued as a stand alone single in April of 1971, “It Don’t Come Easy” is an instant smash. Entering the Hot 100 at #49 on May 1, 1971, it streaks into the top five just five weeks later, peaking at #4. It becomes Ringo’s first million selling single, and one of his most popular and beloved songs. “It Don’t Come Easy” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

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twixnmix: The Beatles and Maharishi Mahesh Y…

twixnmix:

The Beatles and Maharishi Mahesh Yogi photographed by Henry Grossman in Bangor, Wales in 1967.

twixnmix: The Beatles photographed by John L…

twixnmix:

The Beatles photographed by John Launois for The Saturday Evening Post, June 1964. 

The Beatles at Capitol Records in Hollywood,…

The Beatles at Capitol Records in Hollywood,1966.

Photos by Bruce McBroom

twixnmix: The Beatles on the set of Help! (19…

twixnmix:

The Beatles on the set of Help! (1965)

Photos by Emilio Lari 

On this day in music history: November 24, 197…

On this day in music history: November 24, 1973 – “Photograph” by Ringo Starr hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 1 week. Written by Ringo Starr and George Harrison, it is the first solo chart topper for the former Beatle drummer. Ringo Starr’s self-titled third album, has its genesis in early 1973 after producer Richard Perry (Nilsson, Captain Beefheart) asks Starr if he’ll be a presenter at the Grammy Awards which are being telecast in Nashville, TN that year. Starr in turn suggests to Perry that they work together. Perry accepts the offer, quickly assembling musicians and booking studio time in L.A.. They record five songs in five days including all three major singles from the album.  Ringo calls on his former Beatle band mates including George Harrison, who writes two songs for the project, with he and Starr collaborating on “Photograph”. The track features various musician friends including Harrison on 12-string acoustic guitar and harmony vocals, Nicky Hopkins (keyboards), Jim Keltner (drums), Klaus Voorman (bass), Bobby Keys (saxophone) and is arranged by Jack Nitzsche. Any previous doubts about the former Beatle drummer’s post band fortunes are immediately smashed, when “Photograph” is released as the first single from “Ringo” on September 24, 1973. Entering the Hot 100 at #74 on October 6, 1973, it climbs to the top of the chart seven weeks later. The original 45 pressing of the single come with custom picture labels of Starr lying under a silver metallic sheet with the image cropped in the shape of a star. This same image is used for the single picture sleeve and for the labels of the original vinyl LP. “Photograph” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: November 2, 1973…

On this day in music history: November 2, 1973 – “Ringo”, the third album by Ringo Starr is released. Produced by Richard Perry, it is recorded at Sunset Sound Recorders in Hollywood, CA and Apple Studios in London from March 5 – July 26, 1973. The third release from the former Beatle drummer features musical contributions from all three of Starr’s former Beatle band mates, with each either writing songs or appearing on the album. It also features guest appearances by members of The Band, Marc Bolan (of T-Rex), Billy Preston, Klaus Voorman, Jim Keltner, Nicky Hopkins, Harry Nilsson, and Gary Wright. It is a huge critical and commercial success, spinning off three hit singles including “Photograph” and “You’re Sixteen" (#1 Pop) on the Hot 100. The cassette, 8-track tape and promotional copies of the album feature a longer version of the track “Six O’Clock” running 5:26, which leads to some confusion among fans when stock copies list the timing of the long version, but actually contain a shorter edit running 4:06. The long version is oddly not included on the CD reissue of the album, but on the CD version of the follow up release “Goodnight Vienna”. Originally released on CD in 1991, it is most recently remastered and reissued as an SHM-CD by Universal Music Japan in 2016. Out of print on vinyl for decades, it is remastered and reissued as a 180 gram LP by Capitol/UMe in 2017, as part of the vinyl reissue program to commemorate the 75th anniversary of Capitol Records. The reissue replicates the original LP packaging, including the gatefold sleeve, twenty picture and lyric booklet, and the custom labels used on the initial pressing. “Ringo” peaks at number two on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.