Category: ray charles

Albums Released In 1961

Albums Released In 1963

twixnmix:

Vintage R&B Concert Posters

  1. Memorial Auditorium (Chattanooga, Tennessee) – November 16, 1954
  2. Memorial Auditorium (Chattanooga, Tennessee) – June 10, 1959
  3. Oakland Auditorium (Oakland, California) – February 8, 1963
  4. Exhibition Garden (Vancouver, B.C., Canada) – June 26, 1964
  5. Wilmer’s Park (Brandywine, Maryland) – July 25, 1965
  6. Veterans Memorial Auditorium (Columbus, Ohio) – October 25, 1965
  7. Carr’s Beach (Annapolis, Maryland) – June 26, 1966
  8. Civic Auditorium (Knoxville, Tennessee) – March 31, 1967
  9. Shelby County Fairgrounds (Shelbina, Missouri) – July 27, 1968
  10. Norfolk Arena (Norfolk, Virginia) – November 22, 1969

Vintage Rock ‘N Roll and R&B Concert Posters

  1. American Legion Hall (Chattanooga, Tennessee) – July 4, 1951

  2. Memorial Auditorium (Chattanooga, Tennessee) – March 18, 1957

  3. Municipal Auditorium (Kansas City, Missouri) – November 10, 1957

  4. Memorial Auditorium (Chattanooga, Tennessee) – February 4, 1958

  5. Evergreen Ballroom (Olympia, Washington) – May 5, 1963
  6. Sunset Lake Park (Portsmouth, Virginia) – July 4, 1963
  7. Waco Coliseum (Waco, Texas) – March 18, 1965
  8. Civic Auditorium (Knoxville, Tennessee) – February 3, 1967

  9. Victory Stadium (Roanoke, Virginia) – June 26, 1968
  10. Civic Auditorium (Knoxville, Tennessee) – June 28, 1968 

twixnmix:

Vintage R&B Concert Posters

1. Memorial Auditorium (Chattanooga, Tennessee) – November 16, 1954

2. Memorial Auditorium (Chattanooga, Tennessee) – June 10, 1959

3. Oakland Auditorium (Oakland, California) – February 8, 1963

4. Exhibition Garden (Vancouver, B.C., Canada) – June 26, 1964

5. Wilmer’s Park (Brandywine, Maryland) – July 25, 1965

6. Veterans Memorial Auditorium (Columbus, Ohio) – October 25, 1965

7. Carr’s Beach (Annapolis, Maryland) – June 26, 1966

8. Civic Auditorium (Knoxville, Tennessee) – March 31, 1967

9. Shelby County Fairgrounds (Shelbina, Missouri) – July 27, 1968

10. Norfolk Arena (Norfolk, Virginia) – November 22, 1969

Ray Charles photographed by Bill Ray for LIFE magazine, 1966.

On this day in music history: November 14, 1960 – “Georgia On My Mind” by Ray Charles hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 1 week, also peaking at #3 on the R&B singles chart on the same date. Written by Hoagy Carmichael and Stuart Gorrell, it is the first number one pop single for the musician dubbed “The Genius”. Famed musician and songwriter Carmichael writes “Georgia” in 1930, which becomes one of his best known and loved songs. Recorded at Capitol Studios in New York City on March 25, 1960, Charles’ version is released from his album “Genius Hits The Road” (his first for new label ABC-Paramount) in late August of 1960. Entering the Hot 100 at #94 on October 3, 1960, it climbs to the top of the chart seven weeks later. In 1979, Charles’ version of the pop standard is declared the official song for the state of Georgia. Charles also receives a public apology from Georgia state officials after having been banned from performing in the state when he refused to perform to segregated audiences in 1964. Ray Charles’ recording of “Georgia On My Mind” is inducted into the Grammy Hall Of Fame in 1993.

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Vintage R&B Concert Posters

1. Memorial Auditorium (Chattanooga, Tennessee) – November 16, 1954

2. Memorial Auditorium (Chattanooga, Tennessee) – June 10, 1959

3. Oakland Auditorium (Oakland, California) – February 8, 1963

4. Exhibition Garden (Vancouver, B.C., Canada) – June 26, 1964

5. Wilmer’s Park (Brandywine, Maryland) – July 25, 1965

6. Veterans Memorial Auditorium (Columbus, Ohio) – October 25, 1965

7. Carr’s Beach (Annapolis, Maryland) – June 26, 1966

8. Civic Auditorium (Knoxville, Tennessee) – March 31, 1967

9. Shelby County Fairgrounds (Shelbina, Missouri) – July 27, 1968

10. Norfolk Arena (Norfolk, Virginia) – November 22, 1969

On this day in music history: October 9, 1961 – “Hit The Road Jack” by Ray Charles hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 2 weeks, also topping the R&B singles chart for 5 weeks on October 2, 1961. Written by Percy Mayfield, it is the sixth R&B chart topper and second pop chart topper for the Albany, GA born musician nicknamed “The Genius”. The song is originally recorded by Mayfield himself as an acapella demo, sending it to Specialty Records executive and producer Art Rupe. The songwriter then plays the song for his friend Ray Charles who likes it immediately and agrees to record it. The track is recorded at Bell Sound Studios in New York City on July 5, 1961, and features Charles duetting with Margie Hendrix of Charles’ female background vocal trio The Raelettes. Released as a single in August of 1961, “Hit The Road Jack” is an immediate smash. Entering the Hot 100 at #55 on September 11, 1961, it rockets to the top of the chart five weeks later. The single wins Charles a Grammy Award for Best Rhythm & Blues Performance in 1962. In later years, the song is used in numerous films, television shows including “Two And A Half Men”, “The Fisher King”, “Cheech & Chong’s Next Movie” and commercials. Rapper MC Lyte also paraphrases the chorus of “Jack” on her song “Paper Thin” in 1988. “Hit The Road Jack” is also inducted into the Grammy Hall Of Fame in 2013.

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On this day in music history: August 3, 1959 – “What’d I Say” by Ray Charles hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for 1 week, also peaking at #6 on the Hot 100 on August 17, 1959. Written and produced by Ray Charles, it is the fifth R&B chart topper for the Albany, GA born singer, songwriter and musician dubbed “The Genius”. The song is improvised on the spot at a gig in December 1958 when Charles and his band, having played their entire set list begin playing the song when they still have time to fill. After several people inquire about where they can purchase a copy of the song, Charles decides to record it after the tour finishes. The track is recorded at Atlantic Studios in New York City on February 18, 1959. On the session, Charles plays a Wurlitzer electric piano, which at the time is looked down upon by many musicians as a novelty and not a serious instrument. With Ray Charles’ use of the electric piano, he almost singlehandedly popularizes its use after the records release. Clocking in at nearly six and a half minutes, Atlantic Records at first is concerned about its length, and about how radio and the public will react to the suggestive call and response vocals of Charles and The Raelettes in the second half of the song. The label splits the track into two parts for the 45, and holds its release back until Summer. It takes off immediately, becoming the record that finally breaks Ray Charles into the pop mainstream. “What’d I Say” become one his signature songs, and the one he closes his live performances with for the remainder of his career. The single is inducted into the Grammy Hall Of Fame in 2000, and added to the National Recording Registry by The Library Of Congress in 2002.“What’d I Say” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.  

Help support the Behind The Grooves music blog with a donation at: PayPal.Me/jharris1228