Category: quincy jones

On this day in music history: July 1, 1978 – &…

On this day in music history: July 1, 1978 – “Stuff Like That” by Quincy Jones hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for 1 week, also peaking at #21 on the Hot 100 on September 2, 1978. Written by Quincy Jones, Nickolas Ashford, Valerie Simpson, Eric Gale, Steve Gadd, Richard Tee and Ralph MacDonald, it is the first R&B chart topper for the veteran producer/arranger. Jones begins work on his twenty fifth studio album “Sounds… And Stuff Like That!!” following the recording of the soundtrack for “The Wiz”. He invites a number of musicians who had worked on the soundtrack to collaborate on his album including Nick Ashford and Valerie Simpson and members of the R&B/Jazz-Funk band Stuff. Recording at A&R Studios in New York City as well as Cherokee Studios and Westlake Audio in Los Angeles, CA, the track also features Anthony Jackson (bass), David T. Walker (guitar) and George Young (tenor sax). Ashford & Simpson handle lead vocal duties along with Chaka Khan whom they are working with at the time on her first solo album. The group go into the studio with just the title and flesh out the completed song, while jamming and improvising. Released as the first single from “Sounds…” in April of 1978, it quickly becomes a hit on the dance floor and on R&B radio. “Stuff Like That” drive the “Sounds… And Stuff Like That!!” album to Platinum status in the US. Jones will re-visit “Stuff” again in 1995 when he records a new version of the track for the album “Q’s Jook Joint”. The new version features Gap Band lead vocalist Charlie Wilson, Ray Charles, Brandy and saxophonist Kirk Whalum, with Chaka Khan and Ashford & Simpson reprising their vocals.

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On this day in music history: May 13, 1974 -…

On this day in music history: May 13, 1974 – “Body Heat”, the twenty third studio album by Quincy Jones is released. Produced by Quincy Jones and Ray Brown, it is recorded at Westlake Audio in Los Angeles, CA from January – April 1974. Continuing his breakneck pace of producing film and TV scores, as well as his own albums, Quincy Jones charges ahead. “Q” brings together veteran jazz and R&B players, along with relative newcomers. That group includes Herbie Hancock, Dave Grusin, Bob James, Richard Tee (keyboards), Bob Margouleff, Malcolm Cecil (synthesizers), Grady Tate, Paul Humphrey, Bernard Purdie, James Gadson (drums), Wah Wah Watson, Phil Upchurch, David T. Walker, Arthur Adams, Dennis Coffey, Eric Gale (guitar), Max Bennett, Chuck Rainey, Melvin Dunlap (bass), Hubert Laws (flute), Frank Rosolino (trombone), Clifford Solomon, Chuck Findley (trumpets), Jerome Richardson, Pete Christlieb (saxophones), Bobbye Hall (percussion), and Leon Ware, Minnie Riperton, Myrna Matthews, Al Jarreau, Jesse Kirkland, Carolyn Willis, Benard Ighner, Bruce Fisher, Jim Gilstrap, Joseph Greene, Tom Bahler (vocals). Straddling the line between jazz and R&B since “Gula Matari”, Jones makes his first real move toward mainstream R&B with “Body Heat”. The sensual title track (#85 R&B), is sung by Leon Ware (“I Want You”, “Inside My Love”) and Bruce Fisher. Ware is also featured with then Wonderlove backing vocalist (and soon to be a star in her own right) Minnie Riperton on “If I Ever Lose This Heaven” (#71 R&B). The album becomes Quincy Jones’ most successful to date. It marks a major turning point in Jones’ career, beginning a string of highly successful and award winning albums. It’s nearly his last also, when near tragedy strikes only three months after its release. Newly married to actress Peggy Lipton (“The Mod Squad”) and the father of then new baby daughter Kidada, Jones suffers an aneurysm that ruptures while he’s lying in bed with his wife. Though he is quickly raced into emergency surgery to repair the burst blood vessel, it is also discovered he has another aneurysm that has to be operated on. Given only a minimal chance of surviving the second surgery, his friends hold a “memorial service” for him while awaiting the procedure. Miraculously, “Q” survives the second surgery, though is told by doctors he can no longer play the trumpet due to the pressure playing the instrument puts on his frontal lobe. Also remixed and released as a quadraphonic stereo LP and 8-track tape, “Heat” makes its CD debut in 1986. It is remastered and reissued in Japan in 2012, with a high resolution SHM-CD being issued in 2016. “Body Heat” spends fourteen weeks at number one on the Billboard Jazz album chart, one week at number one on the R&B album chart, number six on the Top 200, and is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

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1970s Ebony Magazine Covers

1970s Ebony Magazine Covers

On this day in music history: March 17, 1990 -…

On this day in music history: March 17, 1990 – “The Secret Garden (Sweet Seduction Suite)” by Quincy Jones Featuring Al B. Sure!, James Ingram, El DeBarge and Barry White hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for 1 week, also peaking at #31 on the Hot 100 on April 14, 1990. Written by Quincy Jones, Rod Temperton, Siedah Garrett and El DeBarge, it is third R&B chart topper for the veteran producer, arranger and songwriter. Recording his first studio album since since “The Dude” in 1981, Quincy Jones assembles an exemplary group of both veteran and up and coming musicians and vocalists to be featured on the new album. The collaboration begins with Quincy coming up with the concept of “The Secret Garden”, envisioning it as four men courting the same woman, with each verse describing how they will win her affection. The initial idea for the song is inspired by the book “My Secret Garden” by Nancy Friday. Long time Jones collaborator Rod Temperton comes up with the main chord changes for “The Secret Garden”. Jones invites El DeBarge to contribute, who flys to L.A. help complete the song with Temperton, Jones and Garrett, with all four writing the lyrics. Al B. Sure! fresh off of the huge success of his debut album “In Effect Mode”, and prior to that having been selected by Jones as the recipient of the Sony Innovator Award, is also asked to participate. “Q” also invites Barry White to add the songs “piece de resistance” by singing the final verse, and laying down one of his signature love raps. Stevie Wonder is originally to be among the vocalists on the song, but is replaced by James Ingram when he unable make the session. With the line up of singers in place, each bring their “A” game when it comes time to record their vocals. The nearly seven minute long magnum opus is issued as the second single from the “Back On The Block” album in January of 1990. The seductive ballad follows the previous release “I’ll Be Good To You” (w/ Ray Charles and Chaka Khan) to the top of the R&B singles chart. “The Secret Garden (Sweet Seduction Suite)” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

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Born on this day: March 14, 1933 – Twenty-eigh…

Born on this day: March 14, 1933 – Twenty-eight time Grammy Award winning musician, producer and arranger Quincy Jones (born Quincy Delightt Jones, Jr. in Chicago, IL). Happy 86th Birthday, “Q”!!!

On this day in music history: March 13, 1981 -…

On this day in music history: March 13, 1981 – “The Dude”, the forty third album by Quincy Jones is released. Produced by Quincy Jones, it is recorded at Westlake Audio in Los Angeles, CA and RKM Studios in Brussels, Belgium from April 1980 – January 1981. Taking its title from a piece of African inspired folk art (featured on the front cover), the veteran producer and arrangers first studio album in nearly three years features a group of top notch star and studio musicians that include Stevie Wonder, Michael Jackson, Herbie Hancock, Jean “Toots” Thielemans, Louis Johnson, John Robinson, David “Hawk” Wolinski, Greg Phillinganes, David Foster, Ernie Watts, Steve Lukather, Abraham Laboriel, Ian Underwood, The Seawind Horns, and Paulinho DaCosta. Vocalists on the set include Patti Austin, former Wattsline vocalist Charles May, and introduces James Ingram. The album features material written by Rod Temperton, Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil, and Stevie Wonder to name a few. Proceeded by the single “Ai No Corrida” (#10 R&B, #28 Pop) (originally recorded by co-songwriter Chas Jankel in 1980) released two months prior, the album is major critical and commercial success upon its release. It spins off three more singles including “Just Once” (#11 R&B, #17 Pop, #7 AC), “Razzamatazz” (#17 R&B), and “One Hundred Ways” (#10 R&B, #14 Pop, #5 AC). It is nominated for a record twelve Grammy Awards, winning a total of five including Best Instrumental Arrangement, Best Instrumental Arrangement Accompanying Vocal(s), and Producer Of The Year in 1982. The track “Velas” featuring Belgian guitarist, whistler, and harmonica virtuoso “Toots” Thielemans is later sampled by R&B group Jodeci for their hit single “Get On Up” in 1996. Originally released on CD in 1983 (Japan, US in 1984), the album is remastered and reissued by Universal Japan in 2003. It is reissued again in 2008 as an SHM-CD. Out of print on vinyl since 1989, it is remastered and reissued for Record Store Day in April of 2016, pressed on translucent yellow vinyl. “The Dude” peaks at number three on the Billboard R&B album chart, number three on the Jazz chart, number ten on the Top 200, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

Regular

https://youtu.be/1ZZQuj6htF4

1982 P.Y.T Michael Jackson produced by Quincy Jones

Background Vocal James Ingram

twixnmix: Quincy Jones with wife, actress Peg…

twixnmix:

Quincy Jones with wife, actress Peggy Lipton of the television show Mod Square fame, and their daughter Kidada poolside at their California home.

Photos by Moneta Sleet Jr.

On this day in music history: November 8, 1989…

On this day in music history: November 8, 1989 – “Back On The Block”, the twenty ninth album by Quincy Jones is released. Produced by Quincy Jones, it is recorded at Oceanway Record One, Lighthouse Studios and Westlake Audio in Los Angeles, CA, Digital Recorders in Nashville, TN and Tarpan Studios in San Rafael, CA from Early – Mid 1989. After spending much of the 80’s producing hit albums for Michael Jackson, Patti Austin and James Ingram as well as co-producing and writing the score for the Oscar nominated film “The Color Purple”, Quincy Jones sets his sights on delivering his first album for Warner Bros. Having established his own Qwest Records imprint through the label in 1980, owes his former label A&M Records one more album before his contract is fulfilled. That album is multi Grammy winner “The Dude”, released in March of 1981. However, the multitude of other projects Jones is busy with following it, keep him from recording another new album himself for many years. By 1988, Quincy begins pre-production on his long awaited studio album, also having formed a multi-media alliance with Warner Communications, which also includes developing film and television projects under Quincy Jones Productions. For his album, Jones enlists the assistance of songwriters Rod Temperton, Siedah Garrett and Glen Ballard to write material for the project. “Back On The Block” also features a who’s who of musical talent including Ray Charles, Chaka Khan, Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughn, Barry White, Grandmaster Melle Mel, Ice-T, Big Daddy Kane, James Ingram, El DeBarge and Take 6 are among the artists featured. The resulting album is an artistic and commercial triumph, spinning off three chart topping R&B singles including “I’ll Be Good To You”, “The Secret Garden” and “Tomorrow (A Better You, Better Me)”. The album sweeps the 33rd Annual Grammy Awards in 1991 winning in seven categories including Album Of The Year. Footage from the recording sessions is included in the documentary film “Listen Up: The Lives Of Quincy Jones”, released in 1990. “Back On The Block” spends twelve weeks at number one on the Billboard R&B album chart, peaking at number nine on the Top 200, and is certified 2x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

twixnmix: LL Cool J and Kidada Jones  LL Coo…

twixnmix:

LL Cool J and Kidada Jones 

LL Cool J and Kidada Jones dated from 1992 to 1994. In his book I Make My Own Rules, LL said he cared about

Kidada

and respected her but he broke up with her because of her spirituality beliefs. 

“She would go to an ashram, consult a guru, and pray to statues… Before my album 14 Shots to the Dome dropped, Kidada told me she threw some kind of stick into the eternal fire for my album. I was like ‘Yo why did you do that? I didn’t ask you to do that!’ That joint flopped crazily. “Oh, well, I’m sorry I cared!” she said. I had hurt her feelings, but she had hurt me too. I know she meant well, but I just couldn’t get with that. She took me to her guru once and I remember kneeling before this strange young woman who was touching feathers.