Category: public enemy

Born on this day: August 1, 1960 – Chuck D., l…

Born on this day: August 1, 1960 – Chuck D., leader of the legendary rap group Public Enemy (born Carlton Douglas Ridenour in Roosevelt, LI, NY). Happy 59th Birthday, Chuck!!!

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On this day in music history: June 28, 1988 – …

On this day in music history: June 28, 1988 – “It Takes A Nation Of Millions To Hold Us Back”, the second album by Public Enemy is released. Produced by The Bomb Squad (Hank Shocklee, Carl Ryder (aka “Chuck D.”) and Eric “Vietnam” Sadler), it is recorded at Chung King House Of Metal, Greene Street Studios in New York City and Sabella Studios in Long Island, NY from Mid – Late 1987. Following up their acclaimed debut “Yo! Bum Rush The Show”, the Long Island, NY based rap group looks to surpass their previous effort, wanting to capture on record the same energy generated by their live performances. Made up of tracks packed densely with samples, and combined with powerful pro-black, politically and socially conscious lyrics delivered by Chuck D. and Flavor Flav (often providing a stream of conscious lyrical counterpoint), the finished album is unlike anything heard before in Hip Hop. It makes a major impact upon its release not only within the rap music community, but also with the mainstream rock press who praise it not only as a watershed release for the genre, but as one of the best and most important albums of the era. It spins off five singles including “Don’t Believe The Hype” (#18 R&B), “Bring The Noise” (#56 R&B), and “Night Of The Living Baseheads” (#62 R&B). The album is reissued as a limited edition release on vinyl for Record Store Day on April 19, 2014, marking the first time the landmark rap album has been available on vinyl in more than a decade. “It Takes A Nation Of Millions To Hold Us Back” spends one week at number one on the Billboard R&B album chart, peaking at number forty two on the Top 200, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

Help support the Behind The Grooves music blog with a donation by clicking on the link at: PayPal.Me/jharris1228

On this day in music history: April 10, 1990 -…

On this day in music history: April 10, 1990 – “Fear Of A Black Planet”, the third album by Public Enemy is released. Produced by Carl Ryder (Chuck D.), Hank Shocklee, Keith Shocklee and Eric “Vietnam” Sadler (aka “The Bomb Squad”), it is recorded at Greene Street Studios in New York City, Spectrum City Studios and The Music Palace in West Hempstead, L.I., NY from June – October 1989. After the major critical and significant commercial success of their second album “It Takes A Nation Of Millions To Hold Us Back”, Public Enemy return to the studio in mid 1989 to begin work on the follow up. Before that happens, the group become embroiled in controversy when Minister Of Information Professor Griff is interviewed by the Washington Times in May of 1989. In the interview, Griff makesanti-semitic remarks which erupt into a media firestorm, leading to his dismissal from the group. The controversy becomes so intense that Chuck D. announces that P.E. is disbanding just as “Fight The Power” (#1 Rap, #20 R&B), from Spike Lee’s film “Do The Right Thing” is being released. In truth, the statement is made in order to take the media scrutiny off of them, and to be able to work in relative peace. Much like previous album, P.E. seizes the opportunity to make statements about issues affecting the African American community, primarily “the state of race relations” in the United States. Like its predecessor, “Planet” weaves a musically dense fabric of samples for each track, utilizing various tools including the E-mu SP-1200 sampler/drum machine, Akai S9000, and a Apple Macintosh computer to create the tracks. Due to the complexity of synchronizing the large number of samples, and the time limitations of the samplers, The Bomb Squad layer them on multi-track tape by recording a SMPTE time code (used for synchronizing film and sound) on to the tape, in order to properly synchronize all of the samples. Proceeded by the single “Welcome To The Terrordome” (#3 Rap, #15 R&B, #31 Pop) in January of 1990, chronicling the recent controversy with Griff (who is quietly reinstated back into the group), anticipation for the album is high. When “Fear Of A Black Planet” is released, it is a major success with fans and critics alike. It spins off a total of five singles including “911 Is A Joke” (#1 Rap, #15 R&B, and “Brothers Gonna Work It Out” (#22 Rap, #20 R&B). “Black Planet” is regarded as one of the best albums of the 90’s, and is added to the National Recording Registry by The Library Of Congress in 2005. In 2018, “Fight The Power” is inducted into the Grammy Hall Of Fame, becoming the first of P.E.’s seminal and influential recordings to be recognized by NARAS as being “culturally and historically significant”. “Fear Of A Black Planet” peaks at number three on the Billboard R&B album chart, number ten on the Top 200, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

Help support the Behind The Grooves music blog with a donation by clicking on the link at: PayPal.Me/jharris1228

On this day in music history: October 1, 1991 …

On this day in music history: October 1, 1991 – “Apocalypse ‘91… The Enemy Strikes Black”, the fourth album by Public Enemy is released. Produced by The Imperial Grand Ministers Of Funk (Stuart Robertz, Cerwin ‘C-Dawg’ Depper, Gary G-Wiz, and The JBL), it is recorded at The Music Palace, Spectrum City Studios, Demo World in West Hempstead, L.I., NY from Early – Mid 1991. Following the success of their previous release, “Fear Of A Black Planet”, Public Enemy return to the studio in early 1991 to work on their follow up release. Bringing in a new group of producers spearheaded by Bomb Squad member Gary “Gary G-Wiz” Rinaldo, with the other Bomb Squad members Eric “Vietnam” Sadler and Keith Shocklee having left the fold after working on the last P.E. album and Son Of Bazerk project. Chuck D. and Hank Shocklee, the “senior” members of the Bomb Squad take more of a supervisory role, acting as the executive producers for the new album. Even with this slight change to the groups production line up, Public Enemy’s dense sample heavy sound, supported by their politically and socially conscious lyrics remain intact. The album touches on a number of subjects including the history of the African slave trade (“Can’t Truss It” #1 Rap, #9 R&B, #50 Pop), the state of Arizona refusing to observe (at the time) Martin Luther King’s birthday as a national holiday (“By The Time I Get To Arizona”), and liquor companies aggressively marketing malt liquor to the African American community (“1 Million Bottlebags”) by using hip hop music and artists. It spins off a total of four singles including “Shut ‘Em Down” (#1 Rap, #26 R&B), and “Nighttrain” (#17 Rap). “Apocalyse 91” also includes Anthrax’s and P.E’s ad-hock duet cover of P.E.’s classic “Bring The Noise” (recorded for Anthrax’s “Attack Of The Killer B’s” album). Retitled “Bring Tha Noize”, which features Chuck D. and Flavor Flav’s acapella vocals sampled from the 12" single of “Noise”, with the members of Anthrax providing instrumental support and filling in the rest of the vocals. The resulting rock radio airplay and enthusiastic press the song receives, results in a successful joint tour between Public Enemy and Anthrax in the Fall of 1991. The album is a critical and commercial success upon its release, becoming P.E.’s most successful. Out of print on vinyl since its initial press run in 1991, it is reissued in August of 2015 as part of UMe’s “Respect The Classics” vinyl reissue series. The set is pressed on green translucent vinyl, replicating the original gatefold sleeve and custom inner sleeves found on the original release. “Apocalypse ’91… The Enemy Strikes Black” spends one week at number one on the Billboard R&B album chart (on November 23, 1991), peaking at number four on the Top 200, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

Born on this day: August 1, 1960 – Chuck D., l…

Born on this day: August 1, 1960 – Chuck D., leader of the legendary rap group Public Enemy (born Carlton Douglas Ridenour in Roosevelt, LI, NY). Happy 58th Birthday, Chuck!!!

On this day in music history: June 28, 1988 – …

On this day in music history: June 28, 1988 – “It Takes A Nation Of Millions To Hold Us Back”, the second album by Public Enemy is released. Produced by The Bomb Squad (Hank Shocklee, Carl Ryder (aka “Chuck D.”) and Eric “Vietnam” Sadler), it is recorded at Chung King House Of Metal, Greene Street Studios in New York City and Sabella Studios in Long Island, NY from Mid – Late 1987. Following up their acclaimed debut “Yo! Bum Rush The Show”, the Long Island, NY based rap group looks to surpass their previous effort, wanting to capture on record the same energy generated by their live performances. Made up of tracks packed densely with samples, and combined with powerful pro-black, politically and socially conscious lyrics delivered by Chuck D. and Flavor Flav (often providing a stream of conscious lyrical counterpoint), the finished album is unlike anything heard before in Hip Hop. It makes a major impact upon its release not only within the rap music community, but also with the mainstream rock press who praise it not only as a watershed release for the genre, but as one of the best and most important albums of the era. It spins off five singles including “Don’t Believe The Hype” (#18 R&B), “Bring The Noise” (#56 R&B), and “Night Of The Living Baseheads” (#62 R&B). The album is reissued as a limited edition release on vinyl for Record Store Day on April 19, 2014, marking the first time the landmark rap album has been available on vinyl in more than a decade. “It Takes A Nation Of Millions To Hold Us Back” spends one week at number one on the Billboard R&B album chart, peaking at number forty two on the Top 200, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: April 14, 1988 -…

On this day in music history: April 14, 1988 – “It Takes A Nation Of Millions To Hold Us Back”, the second album by Public Enemy is released. Produced by The Bomb Squad (Hank Shocklee, Carl Ryder (aka “Chuck D.”) and Eric “Vietnam” Sadler), it is recorded at Chung King House Of Metal, Greene Street Studios in New York City and Sabella Studios in Long Island, NY from Mid – Late 1987. Following up their acclaimed debut “Yo! Bum Rush The Show”, the Long Island, NY based rap group looks to surpass their previous effort, wanting to capture on record the same energy generated by their live performances. Made up of tracks packed densely with samples, and combined with powerful pro-black, politically and socially conscious lyrics delivered by Chuck D. and Flavor Flav (often providing a stream of conscious lyrical counterpoint), the finished album is unlike anything heard before in Hip Hop. It makes a major impact upon its release not only within the rap music community, but also with the mainstream rock press who praise it not only as a watershed release for the genre, but as one of the best and most important albums of the era. It spins off five singles including “Don’t Believe The Hype” (#18 R&B), “Bring The Noise” (#56 R&B), and “Night Of The Living Baseheads” (#62 R&B). The album is reissued as a limited edition release on vinyl for Record Store Day on April 19, 2014, marking the first time the landmark rap album has been available on vinyl in more than a decade. “It Takes A Nation Of Millions To Hold Us Back” spends one week at number one on the Billboard R&B album chart, peaking at number forty two on the Top 200, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: April 10, 1990…

On this day in music history: April 10, 1990 – “Fear Of A Black Planet”, the third album by Public Enemy is released. Produced by Carl Ryder (Chuck D.), Hank Shocklee, Keith Shocklee and Eric “Vietnam” Sadler (aka “The Bomb Squad”), it is recorded at Greene Street Studios in New York City, Spectrum City Studios and The Music Palace in West Hempstead, L.I., NY from June – October 1989. After the major critical and significant commercial success of their second album “It Takes A Nation Of Millions To Hold Us Back”, Public Enemy return to the studio in mid 1989 to begin work on the follow up. Before that happens, the group become embroiled in controversy when Minister Of Information Professor Griff is interviewed by the Washington Times in May of 1989. In the interview, Griff makesanti-semitic remarks which erupt into a media firestorm, leading to his dismissal from the group. The controversy becomes so intense that Chuck D. announces that P.E. is disbanding just as “Fight The Power” (#1 Rap, #20 R&B), from Spike Lee’s film “Do The Right Thing” is being released. In truth, the statement is made in order to take the media scrutiny off of them, and to be able to work in relative peace. Much like previous album, P.E. seizes the opportunity to make statements about issues affecting the African American community, primarily “the state of race relations” in the United States. Like its predecessor, “Planet” weaves a musically dense fabric of samples for each track, utilizing various tools including the E-mu SP-1200 sampler/drum machine, Akai S9000, and a Apple Macintosh computer to create the tracks. Due to the complexity of synchronizing the large number of samples, and the time limitations of the samplers, The Bomb Squad layer them on multitrack tape by recording a SMPTE timecode (used for synchronizing film and sound) on to the tape, in order to properly synchronize all of the samples. Proceeded by the single “Welcome To The Terrordome” (#3 Rap, #15 R&B, #31 Pop) in January of 1990, chronicling the recent controversy with Griff (who is quietly reinstated back into the group), anticipation for the album is high. When “Fear Of A Black Planet” is released, it is a major success with fans and critics alike. It spins off a total of five singles including “911 Is A Joke” (#1 Rap, #15 R&B, and “Brothers Gonna Work It Out” (#22 Rap, #20 R&B). “Black Planet” is regarded as one of the best albums of the 90’s, and is added to the National Recording Registry by The Library Of Congress in 2005. In 2018, “Fight The Power” is inducted into the Grammy Hall Of Fame, becoming the first of P.E.’s seminal and influential recordings to be recognized by NARAS as being “culturally and historically significant”. “Fear Of A Black Planet” peaks at number three on the Billboard R&B album chart, number ten on the Top 200, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA

twixnmix: In the days after Dillinger was k…

twixnmix:

In the days after Dillinger was killed on July 22, 1934, massive crowds lined up outside the Cook County Morgue in Chicago to get a glimpse of the notorious public enemy.

On this day in music history: February 10, 198…

On this day in music history: February 10, 1987 – “Yo! Bum Rush The Show”, the debut album by Public Enemy is released. Produced by The Bomb Squad and Bill Stephney, it is recorded at Spectrum City Studios in Hempstead, L.I., NY from Mid – Late 1986. Originally known as Spectrum City and formed in 1982, the group is organized while Chuck D is a student at Adelphi University. Changing their name to Public Enemy, the groups concept is taken further with addition of DJ Terminator X, Minister Of Information Professor Griff and the S1Ws (aka Security Of The First World). P.E. tempers their music with a strong pro-black message, addressing issues affecting African American youth, and influenced by leaders including Malcolm X and the minister Louis Farrakhan. Powered by Chuck D’s strong lyrical delivery (aided and abetted by sidekick Flavor Flav) and The Bomb Squads innovative use of samples, the album receives copious praise from both underground and mainstream press upon its release including Best Album Of The Year accolades from New Musical Express’ critics poll. It spins off two singles including “Public Enemy No. 1” and “You’re Gonna Get Yours”. The vinyl version is reissued as a 180 gram LP by UK reissue label Simply Vinyl in 2000, and as a standard weight vinyl LP by Universal Music Group in 2014. “Yo! Bum Rush The Show” peaks at number twenty eight on the Billboard R&B album chart,  and number one hundred twenty five on the Top 200.