Category: paul simon

On this day in music history: July 11, 1980 – …

On this day in music history: July 11, 1980 – “Late In The Evening” by Paul Simon is released. Written by Paul Simon, it is the sixteenth solo single for the singer, songwriter and musician from Queens, NY. The Latin flavored “Late In The Evening”, is issued as the first single from the soundtrack to his first starring role in the film “One Trick Pony”. The plot (based on both true life experiences and dramatic fictionalization) centers around Simon, portraying a once popular musician on the down side of his career, looking to make a comeback. The song and soundtrack album features instrumental backing by the Jazz/Funk band Stuff. The film and the accompanying soundtrack album actually feature different versions of the same material. “Late In The Evening” features musicians Steve Gadd (drums), Eric Gale, Hiram Bullock (guitars), Tony Levin (bass), Richard Tee (keyboards), Ralph MacDonald (percussion), Michael Brecker, David Sanborn (saxophones), Jon Faddis (flugelhorn), Randy Brecker, Marvin Stamm (trumpets), Patti Austin and Lani Groves (background vocals). “Late In The Evening” peaks at #6 on the Billboard Hot 100 on September 27, 1980, and also receiving a Grammy Nomination for Best Pop Vocal Performance, Male in 1981.

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Top 10 Greatest Duos of All Time – Rolling Sto…

Top 10 Greatest Duos of All Time – Rolling Stone Magazine

1. The Everly Brothers (Inducted into Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1986)  

2. Ike & Tina Turner (Inducted into Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1991)

3.

Simon & Garfunkel (Inducted into Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1990)

4.

The Louvin Brothers

(Inducted into Country Music Hall of Fame in 2001)

5. Eric B. & Rakim

6. The White Stripes

7. Outkast

8. Richard & Linda Thompson

9. Lee Hazelwood & Nancy Sinatra

10. The Carpenters 

On this day in music history: May 5, 1973 – “T…

On this day in music history: May 5, 1973 – “There Goes Rhymin’ Simon”, the third studio album by Paul Simon is released. Produced by Paul Simon, Phil Ramone, The Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section, Paul Samwell-Smith and Roy Halee, it is recorded at Muscle Shoals Sound Studios in Muscle Shoals, AL, Malaco Recording Studios in Jackson, MS, and Morgan Studios in Willesden, UK from Mid 1972 – Early 1973. Following the success of his first post-Simon & Garfunkel solo album “Paul Simon”, the prolific singer and songwriter establishes solid and productive working relationship with producer and engineer Phil Ramone. Simon also collaborates with the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section as well as the legendary gospel vocal group The Dixie Hummingbirds. Even more musically diverse than his previous effort, the album also features a number of top notch musicians and studio players including Cornell Dupree (guitar), Grady Tate (drums), Paul Griffin (piano), Airto Moriera (percussion) with horn and string arrangements written by Allen Toussaint, Quincy Jones and Del Newman. Released to near universal praise and acclaim, it spins off the hit singles “Kodachrome” and “Loves Me Like A Rock”, both of which peak at #2 on the Billboard Hot 100. The album is remastered and reissued on CD in 2011, with four additional bonus tracks added. Out of print on vinyl for over two decades, it is reissued as a 180 gram LP in a limited individually numbered edition for Record Store Day in 2013. A standard non-numbered edition is currently available. “There Goes Rhymin’ Simon” peaks at number two on the Billboard Top 200 album chart in July of 1973, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

Help support the Behind The Grooves music blog with a donation by clicking on the link at: PayPal.Me/jharris1228

Born on this day: October 13, 1941 – Singer, s…

Born on this day: October 13, 1941 – Singer, songwriter and musician Paul Simon (born Paul Fredric Simon in Newark, NJ). Happy 77th Birthday, Paul!!

On this day in music history: August 12, 1986 …

On this day in music history: August 12, 1986 – “Graceland”, the seventh album by Paul Simon is released. Produced by Paul Simon, it is recorded at Ovation Studios in Johannesburg, Republic Of South Africa, The Hit Factory in New York City, Amigo Studios in Los Angeles, CA, Abbey Road Studios in London, UK and Master-Trak Enterprises, Crowley, LA from October 1985 – June 1986. Following the poorly received “Hearts And Bones” album, Paul Simon is given a cassette of Township Jive music by the South African group The Boyoyo Boys by a friend. His interest is piqued by an instrumental called “Gumboots” (which he later writes lyrics for and records). The music inspires Simon to travel to South Africa and record with a group of South African musicians (which is controversial at the time as it breaks the cultural embargo against the country that is still ruled by separatist system of Apartheid) which also includes the vocal group Ladysmith Black Mambazo. The album also includes contributions and guest appearances by Los Lobos, Linda Ronstadt, and The Everly Brothers. When it is released, it is enthusiastically received, garnering great critical acclaim and commercial success, spinning off three singles including “You Can Call Me Al” (#23 Pop), “The Boy In The Bubble” (#86 Pop) and the title track (#81 Pop). The album wins two Grammy Awards including Album Of The Year in 1987, and Record Of The Year for the title track in 1988. In 2007, the album is added to the National Recording Registry by the Library Of Congress. To commemorate the albums twenty fifth anniversary, it is remastered and reissued as a two CD + DVD box set featuring previously unreleased demos, alternate versions and an interview with Paul Simon on the making of the landmark album. The DVD contains the documentary “Under African Skies” and a full live concert filmed in Harare, Zimbabwe in 1987. The box also contains a notepad, poster and 76 page booklet with photos and extensive annotation. It is also reissued as a 180 gram vinyl LP the same year, with a limited edition number edition released exclusively through Boston based retailer Newbury Comics (limited to 2,000 copies) and clear vinyl LP pressing released through UK retailer HMV Music (limited to 500 copies) in 2015. “Graceland” peaks at number three on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 5x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: May 5, 1973 – “T…

On this day in music history: May 5, 1973 – “There Goes Rhymin’ Simon”, the third studio album by Paul Simon is released. Produced by Paul Simon, Phil Ramone, The Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section, Paul Samwell-Smith and Roy Halee, it is recorded at Muscle Shoals Sound Studios in Muscle Shoals, AL, Malaco Recording Studios in Jackson, MS, and Morgan Studios in Willesden, UK from Mid 1972 – Early 1973. Following the success of his first post-Simon & Garfunkel solo album “Paul Simon”, the prolific singer and songwriter establishes solid and productive working relationship with producer and engineer Phil Ramone. Simon also collaborates with the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section as well as the legendary gospel vocal group The Dixie Hummingbirds. Even more musically diverse than his previous effort, the album also features a number of top notch musicians and studio players including Cornell Dupree (guitar), Grady Tate (drums), Paul Griffin (piano), Airto Moriera (percussion) with horn and string arrangements written by Allen Toussaint, Quincy Jones and Del Newman. Released to near universal praise and acclaim, it spins off the hit singles “Kodachrome” and “Loves Me Like A Rock”, both of which peak at #2 on the Billboard Hot 100. The album is remastered and reissued on CD in 2011, with four additional bonus tracks added. Out of print on vinyl for over two decades, it is reissued as a 180 gram LP in a limited individually numbered edition for Record Store Day in 2013. A standard non-numbered edition is currently available. “There Goes Rhymin’ Simon” peaks at number two on the Billboard Top 200 album chart in July of 1973, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: February 7, 1976…

On this day in music history: February 7, 1976 – “50 Ways To Leave Your Lover” by Paul Simon hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 3 weeks. Written by Paul Simon, it is the lone solo chart topper for the Newark, NJ born singer. songwriter and musician. Like much of the album “Still Crazy After All These Years”, “50 Ways To Leave Your Lover” is inspired by end of his marriage and divorce from his wife Peggy, whom he had married to for six years. The songs’ unique rhythm comes about when drummer Steve Gadd is warming up before the session, playing drumming exercises called “paradiddles”. Simon likes it so much that he makes it part of the arrangement. Background vocals on “50 Ways” are sung by Phoebe Snow, Patti Austin and Valerie Simpson. Issued as the second single from “Still Crazy”, it quickly becomes a smash. Entering the Hot 100 at #74 on December 20, 1975, it leaps to the top of the chart seven weeks later. The success of the single sends “Still Crazy After All These Years” to number one on the Billboard Top 200, winning the Grammy Award for Album Of The Year in 1976. In his acceptance speech, Simon jokingly thanks Stevie Wonder for not having released an album in 1975, since he had won the album of the year prize in the two previous years consecutively. Over the years, “50 Ways” is parodied in various ways, by The Jacksons on their short lived variety series, by Simon himself with The Muppets when he appears on “The Muppet Show” and by actress Julia Louis-Dreyfus on the series “Veep”. Simon’s original version is also sampled by Eminem, and Kid Cudi, as well as being covered by Miley Cyrus, and Brad Mehldau. “50 Ways To Leave Your Lover” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: January 24, 1972…

On this day in music history: January 24, 1972 – “Paul Simon”, the second solo album by Paul Simon is released. Produced by Paul Simon and Roy Halee, it is recorded at CBS Studios in San Francisco, CA, Western Recorders in Los Angeles, CA, CBE Studios in Paris, France and Dynamic Sound Studios in Kingston, Jamaica from January – March 1971. Following the break up of Simon & Garfunkel in late 1970 after the critical and commercial triumph of their fifth album “Bridge Over Troubled Water”, Paul Simon begins the next phase of his career. Having previously recorded his first solo album “The Paul Simon Songbook” which is only released in Europe in 1965, he begins on new project in early 1971. Taking a preliminary step in the genre of world music on “Bridge” with “El Condor Pasa” (#18 Pop) whose melody was adapted from a Peruvian folk song, the musician experiments further with music outside the realm of American pop. Simon goes to Jamaica to work with musicians on the album’s reggae flavored first single “Mother And Child Reunion” (#4 Pop, #4 AC), whose title is inspired in part by a chicken and egg dish he sees on a Chinese restaurant menus. The track features members of Toots & The Maytals, keyboardist Larry Knechtel and Cissy Houston on background vocals. The musician also incorporates jazz, blues and Latin music into the material he writes for his sophomore solo release. “Paul Simon” features guest appearances by a number of other prominent musicians including Ron Carter (bass), Airto Moreira (percussion), Steve Turre (trombone) and legendary gypsy violinist Stephane Grappelli who plays on and co-writes the track “Hobo’s Blues”. Though the album is completed in under three months, it will be another nine months before it arrives in record stores. Nervous about stepping out on his own, in the interim, Simon teaches a songwriting course at NYU in the Summer of 1971 with future stars including Melissa Manchester and Maggie Roche (of The Roches) being among his students. When his second album is finally released in early 1972, it is to immediate acclaim. It receives widespread praise from critics and is enthusiastically embraced by fans, drawn to it by not only diverse musical content, but also for the personal and confessional tone of the lyrics throughout. The album spins off two more singles including “Me And Julio Down By The Schoolyard” (#22 Pop, #6 AC) and “Duncan” (#52 Pop, #30 AC). Originally released on CD in 1987, it is remastered and reissued in 2004 with three additional bonus tracks. Out of print on vinyl since the early 90’s, it is remastered and reissued as a 180 gram LP by Sony Music in 2013. “Paul Simon” peaks at number four on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.