Category: paul mccartney

twixnmix: Couples on the Cover of Rolling Ston…

twixnmix:

Couples on the Cover of Rolling Stone

John Lennon & Yoko Ono (November 23, 1968)

Ike & Tina Turner (October 14, 1971)

Paul & Linda McCartney (January 31, 1974)

Rod Stewart & Britt Ekland (November 6,1975)

Rita Coolidge & Kris Kristofferson (February 23, 1978)

Prince & Vanity (April 28, 1983)

Pamela Anderson & Tommy Lee (May 10, 2001)

Cardi B & Offset (July 2018)

On this day in music history: September 4, 197…

On this day in music history: September 4, 1971 – “Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey” by Paul & Linda McCartney hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 1 week. Written and produced by Paul McCartney and Linda McCartney, it is the first solo chart topper for the former Beatles bassist. The first number one single for Paul McCartney following the break up of The Beatles come from a number of different sources. It is pieced together from various unfinished song fragments McCartney has lying around. Paul’s uncle, Albert Kendall (married to his Aunt Milly) is also an inspiration while the song is being written. The track is recorded at Columbia Studios in New York City in November of 1970, and features Paul on electric and acoustic guitars, bass, piano, lead and background vocals, Linda McCartney on harmony vocals, Denny Seiwell on drums, Hugh McCracken on electric and acoustic guitars, with members of the New York Philharmonic Orchestra playing brass and strings. George Martin actually co-writes the orchestral arrangement for the song with Paul, but is not credited at the time of its original release. After the initial sessions, more overdubs are recorded and final mixing takes place over the next five months. “Uncle Albert” is rush released as a single in the US on August 2, 1971, nearly three months after the album “Ram”, when heavy airplay by American radio stations forces its release. Entering the Hot 100 at #65 on August 14, 1971, it leaps to the top of the chart just three weeks later, making an impressive jump from #12 to #1. The single wins a Grammy Award for Best Arrangement Accompanying Vocalist(s) in 1972. “Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

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The Beatles on set of a “A Hard Day&rs…

The Beatles on set of a “A Hard Day’s Night” (1964)  

On this day in music history: July 19, 1975 – …

On this day in music history: July 19, 1975 – “Listen To What The Man Said” by Wings hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 1 week. Written and produced by Paul McCartney, it is the fourth US solo chart topper for the former Beatle. Following the huge critical and commercial success of “Band On The Run” during 1974, Paul McCartney once again looks for another change of locale to record the follow up. Prior to the sessions, guitarist Jimmy McCullough (formerly of Thunderclap Newman) and drummer Geoff Britton are added to Wings’ line up. The band begin recording the track at songwriter and producer Allen Toussaint’s Sea Saint Studios in New Orleans in early 1975. Unsatisfied with the initial results, they rework parts of the track at Wally Heider Studios in Los Angeles, CA. The single also features saxophonist Tom Scott and guitarist Dave Mason playing on the track. “Listen To What The Man Said” is the first single released from the bands fourth album “Venus And Mars” on May 16, 1975. Entering the Hot 100 at #65 on May 31, 1975, it climbs to the top of the chart seven weeks later. “Listen To What The Man Said” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

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twixnmix: Rolling Stone magazine covers from…

twixnmix:

Rolling Stone magazine covers from 1969

On this day in music history: July 6, 1957 – J…

On this day in music history: July 6, 1957 – John Lennon meets Paul McCartney for the first time at the Woolton Village Fete in Liverpool. They are introduced to each other by mutual friend Ivan Vaughn. The then sixteen year old Lennon is there with his skiffle band The Quarrymen, who are performing on a flatbed truck in the church garden. McCartney (fifteen years old at the time) attends the fete at the invitation of Vaughn. Following the bands performance, Lennon and McCartney meet. During this meeting, McCartney sings and plays the Eddie Cochran song “Twenty Flight Rock” (along with several other songs). He also shows Lennon how to properly tune a guitar. Impressed with McCartney’s musical skill, Lennon asks him to join The Quarrymen a short time later and he accepts. The first meeting between two teenagers marks the beginning of one of the greatest songwriting partnerships, and the genesis of one of the greatest rock & roll bands in history.

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twixnmix: The Beatles filming “Help!” in the B…

twixnmix:

The Beatles filming “Help!” in the Bahamas, 1965.

Though the Caribbean scenes come at the end of the film, they were the first to be shot. They arrived on February 23rd for the 14-day Caribbean shoot. Much of the film’s beach scenes were shot on Cabbage Beach, on the northern side of Paradise Island.

On this day in music history: June 28, 1980 – …

On this day in music history: June 28, 1980 – “Coming Up (Live At Glasgow)” by Paul McCartney & Wings hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 3 weeks. Written by Paul McCartney, it is the seventh solo chart topper for Liverpool, UK born singer, songwriter and musician born James Paul McCartney. Written in the Summer of 1979 while recording his album “McCartney II” at his farmhouse in rural Scotland, he performs all of the instrumental parts and most of the vocals on his own. Months prior to its release as a single, McCartney and his band Wings perform “Coming Up” to live audiences on a brief tour of the UK to rapturous response. The bands show at the Glasgow Apollo in Glasgow, Scotland on December 17, 1979 is recorded and includes a rousing performance of “Coming Up”. When the studio version is released as a single in April of 1980, that performance is also included on the B-side of the 45 with the “Venus And Mars” era track “Lunchbox/Odd Sox”. US radio stations immediately take to the live version, giving it more airplay than the studio version and creating a huge public demand for it. Initially, Columbia Records in the US wants to add the live recording to the “McCartney II” album, but Paul refuses. A compromise is reached with CBS by including a bonus 7" single (actually one sided white label promotional copies originally intended for radio stations only) of the “Live At Glasgow” version with the first pressing of the album. Entering the Hot 100 at #73 on April 26, 1980, it climbs to the top of the chart nine weeks later. “Coming Up” is also instrumental in McCartney’s friend and former band mate John Lennon, coming out of his five year long retirement from the music business. While spending time at his and wife Yoko Ono’s beach house at Cold Spring Harbor in Long Island, NY, Lennon hears the song on the radio just days before its release. Impressed by the song and feeling the competitive urge once again, Lennon is immediately inspired to begin writing the songs, that become the “Double Fantasy” album released in November of 1980. After the chart success of the live recording of “Coming Up” in the US, an alternate live performance recorded at the Hammersmith Odeon in London on December 29, 1979 is released. That version is featured in the live concert film and soundtrack album “Concerts For The People Of Kampuchea” released in 1981. “Coming Up (Live At Glasgow)” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

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Born on this day: June 18, 1942 – Pop music ic…

Born on this day: June 18, 1942 – Pop music icon Sir Paul McCartney (born James Paul McCartney in Liverpool, UK). Happy 77th Birthday, Paul!

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On this day in music history: June 18, 1973 – …

On this day in music history: June 18, 1973 – “Live And Let Die” by Wings is released (UK release date is on June 1, 1973). Written by Paul & Linda McCartney, it is the fifth solo top 10 hit for the former Beatles bass player. The song is composed as the main theme for the eighth James Bond film starring Roger Moore. The films’ producers Albert “Cubby” Broccoli and Harry Saltzman ask McCartney if he will write the title song. Paul agrees to write the theme, then goes into Abbey Road Studios in London with producer George Martin (for the first time since The Beatles break up and is also scoring the film) and an orchestra to cut the track. Upon hearing the finished recording, Saltzman wants a female vocalist (Shirley Bassey and Thelma Houston are both suggested) to sing it, but changes his mind when Paul only allows Wings recording to be used. Entering the Hot 100 at #69 on July 7, 1973, it peaks five weeks later at #2 on the Billboard Hot 100 on August 11, 1973. Spending two weeks in the running up spot, the song is held off of the top by Maureen McGovern’s “The Morning After” and Diana Ross’ “Touch Me In The Morning”.  At the time of its release, “Live And Let Die” becomes the highest charting Bond theme in US to date, and is nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song. The song also becomes a staple of McCartney’s live concert performances, often accompanied by pyrotechnics being set off during the choruses. Wings original recording is also later featured in the film “American Hustle” in 2013. “Live And Let Die” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

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