Category: new edition

On this day in music history: June 20, 1988 – …

On this day in music history: June 20, 1988 – “Heart Break”, the fifth album (sixth overall) by New Edition is released. Produced by Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis, Jellybean Johnson and New Edition, it is recorded at Flyte Tyme Studios in Minneapolis, MN from Late 1987 – Mid 1988. In spite of two Platinum albums, by 1986 New Edition’s future looks uncertain. After Bobby Brown is fired, they record a tepidly received doo wop covers album titled “Under The Blue Moon”. Adding to their personal drama, they are still in debt to their label MCA Records after getting out of a bad management contract, and owe back taxes to the IRS. Ralph Trevsant tells his band mates that he is interested in recording a solo album. Fearing that Ralph may leave, Michael Bivins, Ricky Bell and Ronnie DeVoe bring Johnny Gill into the group. Deciding to stay after all, Tresvant is initially unhappy at Gill’s presence, but eventually makes peace with the decision. With the five members moving out of their teens or now in their twenties, they are looking to move away the bubblegum R&B sound of their early hits, toward a more grown up and mature sound. MCA R&B music President suggests that the group work with Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis on their next album. Fresh off of their phenomenal success co-writing and producing Janet Jackson’s “Control” album, New Edition immediately agree to work with them. Flying to Minneapolis to work in the producers’ own studio Flyte Tyme, they get down to work. Writing seven songs for the album, Jimmy and Terry come up with first rate material that perfectly reflects the group’s transition into grown men. Issued as the first single is “If It Isn’t Love” (#2 R&B, #7 Pop). A startling contrast from their previous hits, the song ushers in a new era for New Edition. It is also accompanied by a simple music video, showing off the group’s razor sharp choreography and stage presence. Receiving great critical acclaim as well as commercial success, it becomes their best selling album. It spins off a total of five singles including “You’re Not My Kind Of Girl” (#3 R&B, #95 Pop), “Can You Stand The Rain” (#1 R&B, #44 Pop), “Crucial” (#4 R&B) and “N.E. Heart Break” (#13 R&B). Though it isn’t released as a single at the time, the track “Boys To Men” featuring Johnny Gill on lead vocals, receives heavy airplay and becomes a favorite among fans. So much so, that when New Edition releases their first greatest hits album in 1991, “Boys” is remixed and added to the compilation to promote it. It also becomes the inspiration for the vocal group Boyz II Men who are discovered by Michael Bivins, while New Edition are on tour in support of the “Heart Break” album. “Heart Break” peaks at number three on the Billboard R&B album chart, number twelve on the Top 200, and is certified 2x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: May 14, 1983 – &…

On this day in music history: May 14, 1983 – “Candy Girl” by New Edition hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for 1 week, also peaking at #46 on the Hot 100 on June 25, 1983. Written and produced by Maurice Starr, it is the first chart topping single for the Boston-based R&B vocal quintet. Songwriter and musician Maurice Starr, then a member of the electrofunk band The Jonzun Crew (“Pack Jam”, “Space Cowboy”), discover New Edition when he sees them perform at a talent contest in their hometown of Boston, MA. Impressed with their stage presence and convinced they have the potential to become a “modern day Jackson 5”, he immediately begins working with them. The producer secures the group a deal with New York based dance label Streetwise Records (formerly owned by dance music remixer/producer Arthur Baker). The Jackson 5 influenced single is also a huge hit internationally (licensed to London Records), going to number one on the UK singles chart. In spite of the success New Edition has under Starr’s tutelage, they part company with him in 1984 when they receive virtually no royalties from the sales of their first album or the major tour in support of it. Starr claims that the tour budget and other expenses (subtracted from the group’s earnings) have left no surplus monies to pay them. For their efforts, the group members receive only an advance of $500 each, a VCR and a “royalty check” totaling only $1.87 a piece. New Edition have to sue Maurice Starr and Streetwise Records to get out of their management and recording contracts.

Help support the Behind The Grooves music blog with a donation by clicking on the link at: PayPal.Me/jharris1228

Whitney Houston and Bobby Brown during 1993 MT…

Whitney Houston and Bobby Brown during 1993 MTV Movie Awards

On this day in music history: November 24, 198…

On this day in music history: November 24, 1984 – “Cool It Now” by New Edition hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for 1 week, also peaking at #4 on the Hot 100 on January 5, 1985. Written and produced by Vincent Brantley and Rick Timas, it is the second R&B chart topper for the Boston, MA based vocal group. Issued as the first single from their self-titled second album in September of 1984, it is the Boston based groups’ first release for new label MCA Records. Having severed ties with former producer/manager Maurice Starr, the group find themselves in an even worse situation. The group end up signing a deal with new managers Steven Machat, Rick Smith and Bill Dern’s production company Jump ‘N’ Shoot, rather than directly to their new label. In spite of the album selling more than two million copies in the US, the group members need to borrow $500,000 each from MCA to hire attorneys, in order to extricate themselves from their deal with Jump ‘N’ Shoot Productions, after the release of the album “All For Love” in 1985. “Cool It Now” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: November 8, 1985…

On this day in music history: November 8, 1985 – “All For Love”, the third album by New Edition is released. Produced by Vincent Brantley, Richard Rudolph, Michael Sembello, Rick Timas and Freddie Perren, it is recorded at George Tobin Recording in North Hollywood, CA, Hollywood Central Studios in Hollywood, CA, O’Henry Sound Studios in Burbank, CA, Bossa Nova Hotel, Mom And Pop’s Living Room in Los Angeles, CA, Omega Recording Studios in Washington, DC, and Sea-Saint Studios in New Orleans, LA from April 13 – October 25, 1985. Following the double Platinum success of their self-titled album for MCA, New Edition begin recording the follow up in the Spring of 1985. Again, they work with producers Vincent Brantley and Rick Timas, as well as veteran R&B producer and songwriter Freddie Perren (The Jackson 5, The Sylvers, Peaches & Herb), Richard Rudolph (Minnie Riperton, Teena Marie) and guitarist Michael Sembello (Stevie Wonder). The album is also the last to feature Bobby Brown (until the reunion album “Home Again” in 1996) who leaves for a solo career, unhappy in his minimal role as a lead vocalist in the group, with MCA favoring principal lead singer Ralph Tresvant. It spins off three singles including “Count Me Out” (#2 R&B, #51 Pop), “A Little Bit Of Love (Is All It Takes) (#3 R&B, #38 Pop) and "With You All The Way” (#7 R&B, #51 Pop). After the release of “All For Love”, the group goes through a major legal battle to extricate themselves from their management contract with Jump And Shoot Productions. New Edition discover that they again are bound to a production deal with their managers, rather than directly to MCA Records. Going over their contracts with attorneys, they discover that all recording costs, promotion and tour support are being paid for out of their meager share of royalties, which leave them in a major amount of debt to their managers and record label. By 1987, they are able to get out of their bad business dealings and sign directly with MCA. “All For Love” peaks at number thirteen on the Billboard R&B album chart, number thirty two on the Top 200, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

Bobby Brown and Whitney Houston at the 38th An…

Bobby Brown and Whitney Houston at the 38th Annual Grammy Awards Pre-Party Hosted by Clive Davis on February 27, 1996 at Beverly Hills Hotel.

On this day in music history: June 20, 1988 – …

On this day in music history: June 20, 1988 – “Heart Break”, the fifth album (sixth overall) by New Edition is released. Produced by Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis, Jellybean Johnson and New Edition, it is recorded at Flyte Tyme Studios in Minneapolis, MN from Late 1987 – Mid 1988. In spite of two Platinum albums, by 1986 New Edition’s future looks uncertain. After Bobby Brown is fired, they record a tepidly received doo wop covers album titled “Under The Blue Moon”. Adding to their personal drama, they are still in debt to their label MCA Records after getting out of a bad management contract, and owe back taxes to the IRS. Then lead singer Ralph Trevsant tells his band mates that he is interested in recording a solo album. Fearing that Ralph may leave, Michael Bivins, Ricky Bell and Ronnie DeVoe bring Johnny Gill into the group. Deciding to stay after all, Tresvant is initially unhappy at Gill’s presence, but eventually makes peace with the decision. With the five members moving out of their teens or now in their twenties, they are looking to move away the bubblegum R&B sound of their early hits, toward a more grown up and mature sound. MCA R&B music President suggests that the group work with Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis on their next album. Fresh off of their phenomenal success co-writing and producing Janet Jackson’s “Control” album, New Edition immediately agree to work with them. Flying to Minneapolis to record in the producers’ own studio Flyte Tyme, they get down to work. Writing seven songs for the album, Jimmy and Terry come up with first rate material that perfectly reflects the group’s transition into grown men. Issued as the first single nearly two weeks before the album is “If It Isn’t Love” (#2 R&B, #7 Pop). A startling contrast from their previous hits, it is an immediate smash on both the R&B and Pop charts, ushering in a new era for New Edition. It is also accompanied by a simple music video, showing off the group’s razor sharp choreography and stage presence. Receiving great critical acclaim as well as commercial success, it becomes their best selling album. It spins off a total of five singles including “You’re Not My Kind Of Girl” (#3 R&B, #95 Pop), “Can You Stand The Rain” (#1 R&B, #44 Pop), “Crucial” (#4 R&B) and “N.E. Heart Break” (#13 R&B). Though it isn’t released as a single at the time, the track “Boys To Men” that is Johnny Gill’s lone lead vocal on the album, receives heavy airplay and becomes a favorite among fans. So much so, that when New Edition releases their first greatest hits album in 1991, “Boys” is remixed and added to the compilation to promote it. It also becomes the inspiration for the vocal group Boyz II Men who are discovered by Michael Bivins, while New Edition are on tour in support of the “Heart Break” album. “Heart Break” peaks at number three on the Billboard R&B album chart, number twelve on the Top 200, and is certified 2x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

twixnmix: Bobby Brown, Salt-N-Pepa and Ike Tur…

twixnmix:

Bobby Brown, Salt-N-Pepa and Ike Turner at the Rhythm & Blues Foundation

Pioneer Awards in 1995.

On this day in music history: May 14, 1983 – &…

On this day in music history: May 14, 1983 – “Candy Girl” by New Edition hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for 1 week, also peaking at #46 on the Hot 100 on June 25, 1983. Written and produced by Maurice Starr, it is the first chart topping single for the Boston-based R&B vocal quintet. Songwriter and musician Maurice Starr, then a member of the electrofunk band The Jonzun Crew (“Pack Jam”, “Space Cowboy”), discover New Edition when he sees them perform at a talent contest in their hometown of Boston, MA. Impressed with their stage presence and convinced they have the potential to become a “modern day Jackson 5”, he immediately begins working with them. The producer secures the group a deal with New York based dance label Streetwise Records (formerly owned by dance music remixer/producer Arthur Baker). The Jackson 5 influenced single is also a huge hit internationally (licensed to London Records), going to number one on the UK singles chart. In spite of the success New Edition has under Starr’s tutelage, they part company with him in 1984 when they receive virtually no royalties from the sales of their first album or the major tour in support of it. Starr claims that the tour budget and other expenses (subtracted from the group’s earnings) have left no surplus monies to pay them. For their efforts, the group members receive only an advance of $500 each, a VCR and a “royalty check” totaling only $1.87 a piece. New Edition have to sue Maurice Starr and Streetwise Records to get out of their management and recording contracts.

twixnmix:Bobby Brown, Salt-N-Pepa and Ike Turn…

twixnmix:

Bobby Brown, Salt-N-Pepa and Ike Turner at the Rhythm & Blues Foundation

Pioneer Awards, 1995.