Category: neil young

On this day in music history: May 14, 1969 – “…

On this day in music history: May 14, 1969 – “Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere”, the second studio album by Neil Young is released. Produced by Neil Young and David Briggs, it is recorded at Wally Heider Studio 3 in Hollywood, CA in January and March 1969.  Recorded in just two weeks worth of studio time, it is the first to feature Young’s backing band Crazy Horse. The album features some of Neil Young’s best known material including “Cinnamon Girl (#55 Pop), “Down By The River”, and “Cowgirl In The Sand”. Young writes all three songs in one day while sick in bed with a 103° fever. The three singles issued from the album are released over a nearly one year period, with the title track proceeding the full album in March of 1969. It is followed by an edited version of “Down By The River” in October, which also does not chart. In the interim, “Oh Lonesome Me”, the first single from Young’s next album “After The Gold Rush” is released in February of 1970. Issued eleven months after the album, “Cinnamon Girl” is put out almost as an afterthought, but becomes Neil Young’s first chart single. In spite of its modest chart placement, it becomes one of the musician’s most popular and enduring songs. Released only four months after his solo debut, the raw and rocking “Nowhere” establishes the template of how Young writes and records many of his seminal recordings in the future, also influencing many other musicians that follow. Originally released on CD in 1987, it is remastered and reissued in 2009 with HDCD encoding, and as a digital download. It is also released as a 180 gram vinyl LP, individually and as part of a limited edition box set featuring Young’s first four solo albums. The reissue replicates the original album packaging including the gatefold sleeve. The album had also been scheduled for release as a high resolution Blu-ray disc, but to date has not been released in that format. “Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere” peaks at number thirty four on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: March 18, 1972 -…

On this day in music history: March 18, 1972 – “Heart Of Gold” by Neil Young hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 1 week. Written by Neil Young, it is the biggest hit for the Canadian born singer, songwriter and musician. Young is inspired to write the song during a period when he is in and out of the hospital being treated for a back injury. Forced to wear a back brace during much of the albums recording, Young is physically unable to play electric guitar, playing acoustic on many tracks instead. “Heart Of Gold” is recorded at Quadrafonic Sound Studios in Nashville, TN in early 1971, while Young is in town taping an appearance on Johnny Cash’s weekly music variety series. “Gold” also features background vocals from Young’s friends James Taylor and Linda Ronstadt. Issued as the first single from his fourth solo album “Harvest” in January of 1972, it quickly becomes a radio smash. Entering the Hot 100 at #62 on February 5, 1972, it climbs to the top of the chart six weeks later. The success of “Heart Of Gold” also drives the “Harvest” album to number one on the Billboard Top 200 on March 11, 1972, spending two weeks at the top. The mono 45 mix of “Gold” along with its original B-side “Sugar Mountain” are reissued as a limited edition 7" on Record Store Day in April of 2010. “Heart Of Gold” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

Help support the Behind The Grooves music blog with a donation at: PayPal.Me/jharris1228

Born on this day: November 12, 1945 – Singer, …

Born on this day: November 12, 1945 – Singer, songwriter and musician Neil Young (born Neil Percival Young in Toronto, Ontario, Canada). Happy 73rd Birthday, Neil!!!

On this day in music history: November 12, 196…

On this day in music history: November 12, 1968 – “Neil Young”, the debut album by Neil Young is released. Produced by Neil Young, David Briggs, Jack Nitzsche and Ry Cooder, it is recorded at Wally Heider Recording, Sunset Sound Recorders and TTG Recording Studios in Hollywood, CA from August – October 1968. His first release following his departure from Buffalo Springfield, the album features Young with musical support from Ry Cooder, Earl Palmer, Carol Kaye, Jim Messina, and Jack Nitzsche. It is initially released with the Haeco-CSG encoding system, designed to make stereo records compatible with mono turntables, just as mono LP’s are being phased out in the US. The end result makes the recording sound out of phase when played in either stereo or mono. Unhappy with the sound of the final product,  Young remixes part of the album, and it is reissued without the processing in November of 1969, a year after the LP’s initial release. The album’s modest sales make the first pressing a sought after collector’s item by fans, who feel that the original mixes are superior in spite the post production processing. It is remastered and reissued in 2009, on CD (with HDCD encoding) and as a 180 gram vinyl LP.  "Neil Young" does not chart on the Billboard Top 200.

On this day in music history: August 31, 1970 …

On this day in music history: August 31, 1970 – “After The Gold Rush”, the third album by Neil Young is released. Produced by Neil Young, David Briggs and Kendall Pacios, it is recorded at Sunset Sound Recorders in Hollywood, CA, Sound City Studios in Van Nuys, CA and Neil Young’s Home Studio in Los Angeles, CA from August 1969 – June 1970. Having recently joined his former Buffalo Springfield bandmate Stephen Stills in Crosby, Stills & Nash, the band name is amended to add Young. CSNY release the classic “Deja Vu” album in the Spring of 1970, before the individual band members embark on solo projects. Young records a sizeable portion of his third release in his home studio in Topanga Canyon with members of his band Crazy Horse, including a then eighteen year old guitarist named Nils Lofgren. Overdubs and vocals are recorded at Sunset Sound and Sound City Studios. It spins off two singles including “Only Love Can Break Your Heart” (#33 Pop) and “When You Dance I Can Really Love” (#93 Pop), though the albums centerpiece is the track “Southern Man”, a sharp rebuke against racism. Originally released on CD in the late 80’s, it is remastered and reissued in 2009 with HDCD encoding and is reissued on vinyl. “After The Gold Rush” peaks at number eight on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 2x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: July 27, 1983 – …

On this day in music history: July 27, 1983 – “Everybody’s Rockin’”, the fifteenth studio album by Neil Young is released. Produced by Neil Young and Elliot Mazer, it is recorded at Modern Recorders in Redwood City, CA from April – May 1983. Following the successful and acclaimed live album “Rust Never Sleeps” in 1979, Neil Young moves away from the alternating acoustic country rock and harder rocking sound that has been the hallmark of much of his work in the past decade. Starting the 80’s with the new wave flavored “Reactor” with Crazy Horse, its poor critical and commercial reception ends Young’s contract with Reprise Records. In 1981, Young’s former manager (CSNY) David Geffen offers him lucrative contract and full creative control to sign to his label Geffen Records. Still following his creative muse, Neil’s first release for Geffen is the synth heavy Kraftwerk influenced “Trans” in 1982. Featuring Young singing through a vocoder on many tracks, it is greeted with confusion by many long time fans. Unhappy with its commercial performance, Geffen demands that the musician “make a rock & roll record” for his next release. Though never one to be dictated to or known to veer from his own musical vision, Young decides to comply with the request, but does it his way with a highly ironic twist and as a symbolic middle finger toward Geffen. Rather than making a contemporary and mainstream commercial rock album, he instead makes a 50’s style rockabilly record. Featuring original songs and covers of early rock & roll and rhythm & blues classics by Jimmy Reed, Junior Parker and Slim Harpo, Neil Young titles the set “Everybody’s Rockin’”. Assembling an ad-hoc band dubbed “The Shocking Pinks” (Tim Drummond, Larry Byrom, Karl Himmel, Ben Keith, Rick Palombi and Anthony Crawford), the ten song album clocks in at just under twenty five minutes, making it the shortest album of his career. The first single “Wonderin’” is accompanied by a quirky music video directed by Tim Pope, best known for his work with The Cure. To give the footage an unusual look, Pope shoots it with the camera and music sync running at a slower than normal speed with abrupt jump cutting, looking unnaturally sped up upon playback. The album is largely savaged by critics and ignored by the public, though over time has developed a cult following among Neil Young fans. The poor sales of “Everybody’s Rockin’” leads to Geffen suing Young for $3.3 million, for making albums that were “not commercial” and “musically uncharacteristic”. Young counter sues for $21 million, sighting that the label had breached their promise of “no creative interference”. In spite of the lawsuits, Young fulfills his contract with Geffen, releasing two more albums before leaving and returning to Reprise Records by the end of the 80’s. “Everybody’s Rockin’” peaks at number forty six on the Billboard Top 200.

On this day in music history: May 14, 1969 – “…

On this day in music history: May 14, 1969 – “Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere”, the second studio album by Neil Young is released. Produced by Neil Young and David Briggs, it is recorded at Wally Heider Studio 3 in Hollywood, CA in January and March 1969.  Recorded in just two weeks worth of studio time, it is the first to feature Young’s backing band Crazy Horse. The album features some of Neil Young’s best known material including “Cinnamon Girl (#55 Pop), “Down By The River”, and “Cowgirl In The Sand”. Young writes all three songs in one day while sick in bed with a 103° fever.

The three singles issued from the album are released over a nearly one year period, with the title track proceeding the full album in March of 1969. It is followed by an edited version of "Down By The River” in October, which also does not chart. In the interim, "Oh Lonesome Me”, the first single from Young’s next album “After The Gold Rush” is released in February of 1970. Issued eleven months after the album, “Cinnamon Girl” is put out almost as an afterthought, but becomes Neil Young’s first chart single. In spite of its modest chart placement, it becomes one of the musician’s most popular and enduring songs. Released only four months after his solo debut, the raw and rocking “Nowhere” establishes the template of how Young writes and records many of his seminal recordings in the future, also influencing many other musicians that follow. Originally released on CD in 1987, it is remastered and reissued in 2009 with HDCD encoding, and as a digital download. It is also released as a 180 gram vinyl LP, individually and as part of a limited edition box set featuring Young’s first four solo albums. The reissue replicates the original album packaging including the gatefold sleeve. The album had also been scheduled for release as a high resolution Blu-ray disc, but to date has not been released in that format. “Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere” peaks at number thirty four on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: March 18, 1972 -…

On this day in music history: March 18, 1972 – “Heart Of Gold” by Neil Young hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 1 week. Written by Neil Young, it is the biggest hit for the Canadian born singer, songwriter and musician. Young is inspired to write the song during a period when he is in and out of the hospital being treated for a back injury. Forced to wear a back brace during much of the albums recording, Young is physically unable to play electric guitar, playing acoustic on many tracks instead. “Heart Of Gold” is recorded at Quadrafonic Sound Studios in Nashville, TN in early 1971, while Young is in town taping an appearance on Johnny Cash’s weekly music variety series. “Gold” also features background vocals from Young’s friends James Taylor and Linda Ronstadt. Issued as the first single from his fourth solo album “Harvest” in January of 1972, it quickly becomes a radio smash. Entering the Hot 100 at #62 on February 5, 1972, it climbs to the top of the chart six weeks later. The success of “Heart Of Gold” also drives the “Harvest” album to number one on the Billboard Top 200 on March 11, 1972, spending two weeks at the top. The mono 45 mix of “Gold” along with its original B-side “Sugar Mountain” are reissued as a limited edition 7" on Record Store Day in April of 2010. “Heart Of Gold” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

Born on this day: November 12, 1945 – Singer, songwriter and…

Born on this day: November 12, 1945 – Singer, songwriter and musician Neil Young (born Neil Percival Young in Toronto, Ontario, Canada). Happy 72nd Birthday, Neil!!!

On this day in music history: November 12, 1968 – “Neil…

On this day in music history: November 12, 1968 – “Neil Young”, the debut album by Neil Young is released. Produced by Neil Young, David Briggs, Jack Nitzsche and Ry Cooder, it is recorded at Wally Heider Recording, Sunset Sound Recorders and TTG Recording Studios in Hollywood, CA from August – October 1968. His first release following his departure from Buffalo Springfield, the album features Young with musical support from Ry Cooder, Earl Palmer, Carol Kaye, Jim Messina, and Jack Nitzsche. It is initially released with the Haeco-CSG encoding system, designed to make stereo records compatible with mono turntables, just as mono LP’s are being phased out in the US. The end result makes the recording sound out of phase when played in either stereo or mono. Unhappy with the sound of the final product,  Young remixes part of the album, and it is reissued without the processing in November of 1969, a year after the LP’s initial release. The album’s modest sales make the first pressing a sought after collector’s item by fans, who feel that the original mixes are superior in spite the post production processing. “Neil Young” does not chart on the Billboard Top 200.