Category: latino

Ramon Novarro and Joan Crawford in Across to Singapore (1928)  

twixnmix:

Che Guevara with his ex-wife

Hilda Gadea

and their daughter, Hildita, on

her 4th birthday in 1960.

Below is a letter he sent from the Bolivian jungle to Hildita for her 10th birthday on February 15, 1966:

Dearest Hildita,

I am writing you now, although you’ll receive this letter much later. But I want you to know that I am thinking about you and I hope you’re having a very happy birthday. You are almost a woman now, and I cannot write to you the way I write to the little ones, telling them silly things or little fibs.

You must know that I am still far away and will be gone for quite some time, doing what I can to fight against our enemies. Not that it is a great thing, but I am doing something, and I think you will always be proud of your father, as I am of you.

Remember, there are many years of struggle ahead, and even when you are a woman, you will have to do your part in the struggle. Meanwhile, you have to prepare yourself, be very revolutionary-which at your age means to learn a lot, as much as possible, and always be ready to support just causes. Also, obey your mother and don’t think that you know it all too soon. That will come in time.

You should fight to be among the best in school. The best in every sense, and you already know what that means; study and revolutionary attitude. In other words: good conduct, seriousness, love for the revolution, comradeship, etc.

I was not that way at your age, but I lived in a different society, where man was an enemy of man. Now you have the privilege of living in another era and you must be worthy of it.

Don’t forget to go by the house to keep an eye on the other kids and advise them to study and behave themselves. Especially Aleldita, who pays a lot of attention to you as her older sister.

All right, old lady. Again I hope you are very happy on your birthday. Give a hug to your mother and to Gina. I give you a great big strong one to last as long as we don’t see each other.

Your Papa

Freddie Prinze photographed by Barry Kramer, 1975.

twixnmix:

Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz with their children Desi Arnaz Jr and Lucie Arnaz in 1953.

Photos by Ed Clark

twixnmix:

Pam Grier and Freddie Prinze at the 1975 NAACP Image Awards

Pam Grier: “We spent a lot of time talking about our dreams, where we had come from, and where we wanted to go. Freddie was Puerto Rican and Hungarian, and he turned to me to be one of his mentors in his life. I took the job willingly, entranced with his romanticism and his passion for life. I loved that Freddie constantly told me how beautiful I was, asked me questions, and actually listened to the answers. He may have been chronologically younger than I was, but he often showed a maturity beyond his years. When we finally became lovers, we were truly in love, deeply affectionate, and eager to support each other any way we could.” 

In her book Foxy: My Life in Three Acts, Pam details how Freddie was persistent in trying to get her pregnant but she didn’t want to bring a child into the world with him being unstable. He suffered from depression and as his drug abuse worsened she broke up with him.

Che Guevara photographed by René Burri in his office, 1963. 

Che Guevara on the set of Historias de la Revolucion (1960)

Photos by Arturo Zavattini

Heartthrobs of the Silent Era

Sessue Hayakawa

(June 10, 1886 – November 23, 1973)

Rudolph Valentino

(May 6, 1895 – August 23, 1926)

Cullen Landis (July 9, 1896 – August 26, 1975)

Ramón Novarro

(February 6, 1899 – October 30, 1968)

Gary Cooper  (May 7, 1901 – May 13, 1961)

twixnmix:

Pam Grier and Freddie Prinze at the 1975 NAACP Image Awards

Pam Grier: “We spent a lot of time talking about our dreams, where we had come from, and where we wanted to go. Freddie was Puerto Rican and Hungarian, and he turned to me to be one of his mentors in his life. I took the job willingly, entranced with his romanticism and his passion for life. I loved that Freddie constantly told me how beautiful I was, asked me questions, and actually listened to the answers. He may have been chronologically younger than I was, but he often showed a maturity beyond his years. When we finally became lovers, we were truly in love, deeply affectionate, and eager to support each other any way we could.”.

In her book, Pam details how Freddie was persistent in trying to get her pregnant but she didn’t want to bring a child into the world with him being unstable. He suffered from depression and as his drug abuse worsened she broke up with him.

(Excerpt from Foxy: My Life in Three Acts)

Che Guevara with his ex-wife

Hilda Gadea

and their daughter, Hildita, on

Hildita’s 4th birthday in 1960.

Below is a letter he sent from the Bolivian jungle to Hilda for her 10th birthday on February 15, 1966:

Dearest Hildita,

I am writing you now, although you’ll receive this letter much later. But I want you to know that I am thinking about you and I hope you’re having a very happy birthday. You are almost a woman now, and I cannot write to you the way I write to the little ones, telling them silly things or little fibs.

You must know that I am still far away and will be gone for quite some time, doing what I can to fight against our enemies. Not that it is a great thing, but I am doing something, and I think you will always be proud of your father, as I am of you.

Remember, there are many years of struggle ahead, and even when you are a woman, you will have to do your part in the struggle. Meanwhile, you have to prepare yourself, be very revolutionary-which at your age means to learn a lot, as much as possible, and always be ready to support just causes. Also, obey your mother and don’t think that you know it all too soon. That will come in time.

You should fight to be among the best in school. The best in every sense, and you already know what that means; study and revolutionary attitude. In other words: good conduct, seriousness, love for the revolution, comradeship, etc.

I was not that way at your age, but I lived in a different society, where man was an enemy of man. Now you have the privilege of living in another era and you must be worthy of it.

Don’t forget to go by the house to keep an eye on the other kids and advise them to study and behave themselves. Especially Aleldita, who pays a lot of attention to you as her older sister.

All right, old lady. Again I hope you are very happy on your birthday. Give a hug to your mother and to Gina. I give you a great big strong one to last as long as we don’t see each other.

Your Papa