Category: kc & the sunshine band

On this day in music history: November 22, 197…

On this day in music history: November 22, 1975 – “That’s The Way (I Like It)” by KC & The Sunshine Band hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 2 weeks (non-consecutive), also topping the R&B singles chart for 1 week on November 29, 1975. Written by Harry Wayne Casey and Richard Finch, it is the second consecutive number one single for the R&B band from Hialeah , FL. Knowing instinctively that a little controversy can be good for anyone’s career, KC and his songwriting partner and band mate Rick Finch, turn to subject matter of a more carnal nature for their next big hit.The trademark “ah-ha, ah-ha” refrain in “That’s The Way (I Like It)” was originally recorded as sensual moans and groans, but is given a more “benign” vocalization when the vocals are re-recorded. Issued as the third single from their self-titled second album in October of 1975,  it takes off even faster than its predecessor “Get Down Tonight”. Entering the Hot 100 at #50 on October 25, 1975, it rockets to the top of the chart just four weeks later. “That’s The Way” holds the top spot for one week, then is bumped from the pole position by the Silver Convention’s “Fly Robin Fly” for three weeks. Slipping back as far as #4, the single regains its bullet (signifying upward chart momentum), leaping back to the number one spot for one more week on December 20, 1975. One of the quintessential songs of the Disco Era, “That’s The Way (I Like It)” has been covered several times over the years by different artists, including versions by Giorgio Moroder, Dead Or Alive and by The Spin Doctors and Biz Markie for the film “Space Jam”.

On this day in music history: September 24, 19…

On this day in music history: September 24, 1977 – “Keep It Comin’ Love” by KC & The Sunshine Band hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for 1 week, also peaking at #2 on the Hot 100 on October 1, 1977. Written by Harry Wayne Casey and Richard Finch, it is the fourth R&B chart topper for the R&B Disco/Funk band from Hialeah, FL. With the back to back chart topping singles “Get Down Tonight” and “That’s The Way (I Like It)” under their belts, KC & The Sunshine band continue their hit streak into 1976 when they release their fourth studio album titled “Part 3”. The lead single “(Shake, Shake, Shake) Shake Your Booty” released ahead of the album in May quickly become the bands third number one pop and R&B hit. Two more singles “I Like To Do It” (#4 R&B, #37 Pop) and their fourth chart topper “I’m Your Boogie Man” (#1 Pop & R&B) follow. Employing a similar writing technique used on “That’s The Way (I Like It)”, KC and bassist Richard Finch use the title “keep it comin’ love” along with the refrain “don’t stop it now, don’t stop it no, don’t stop it now, don’t stop”  as repetitive hooks to sear it in the listeners memory. The song is the final track on the album, directly segueing out of “I’m Your Boogie Man”. With many club DJ’s playing both cuts back to back, it is a natural for a future single release. After “Boogie Man” peaks,  KC & The Sunshine Band’s label TK Records issues “Keep It Comin’ Love” nine months after the initial release of “Part 3” in July of 1977. It quickly follows its predecessor up the charts, becoming the bands fourth million selling single, with the album also crossing the million mark in sales. It stops short of the top on the Hot 100, holding at #2 for three weeks when it is unable to unseat either Meco’s “Star Wars/Cantina Band” and  Debby’s Boone’s “You Light Up My Life”.

On this day in music history: August 28, 1976 …

On this day in music history: August 28, 1976 – “(Shake, Shake, Shake) Shake Your Booty” by KC & The Sunshine Band hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for 4 weeks, also topping the Hot 100 for 1 week on September 11, 1976. Written and produced by Harry Wayne Casey and Richard Finch, it is the third chart topping single for the Florida based R&B band. Issued as the first single from the bands “Part 3” album in June of 1976, it is one of three top five singles (“Keep It Comin’ Love” and “I’m Your Boogie Man”) to be released from it. The original single release of “Shake Your Booty” is backed with the track “Boogie Shoes” from KC & The Sunshine Band’s self-titled second album.  "Shoes" becomes a dance floor favorite and hit in its own right (#29 R&B, #35 Pop), when it is included on the “Saturday Night Fever” soundtrack in 1977. When TK reissues “Boogie Shoes” as an A-side in January of 1978, it is sped up slightly from its originally recorded speed, as it is on the soundtrack album.  It wins the band along with all of the other artists featured on the album a Grammy Award for Album Of The Year in 1979. “(Shake, Shake, Shake) Shake Your Booty” becoming KC & The Sunshine Band’s third million selling single one year to the week after their first chart topper “Get Down Tonight”.

On this day in music history: August 23, 1975 …

On this day in music history: August 23, 1975 – “Get Down Tonight” by KC & The Sunshine Band hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for 1 week, also topping the Hot 100 for 1 week on August 30, 1975. Written and produced by Harry Wayne Casey and Richard Finch, it is the first chart topping single for the Hialeah, FL based R&B band. Casey and Finch meet each other in 1973 when they are hired to do odd jobs at local label TK Records. Following the huge success they have as the writers and producers of George McCrae’s international hit “Rock Your Baby”, KC & The Sunshine Band launch their own career with their first album “Do It Good” spinning off the singles “Blow Your Whistle”, “Sound Your Funky Horn” in 1974. On “Get Down Tonight”, the songs signature guitar licks on the intro are achieved by recording guitarist Jerome Smith playing with the tape running at half speed, changing both the sound and texture of the notes dramatically when played back at normal speed. Issued as the first single from their self-titled second album in March of 1975, it hits the R&B and pop charts, climbing both simultaneously. “Get Down Tonight” sells over a million copies in the US, and is the first of four R&B and five pop chart toppers that KC & The Sunshine Band have over the next four and a half years.

On this day in music history: June 11, 1977 – …

On this day in music history: June 11, 1977 – “I’m Your Boogie Man” by KC & The Sunshine Band hits # 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 1 week, also peaking at #3 on the R&B singles chart on June 4, 1977. Written and produced by Harry Wayne Casey and Richard Finch, it is the fourth chart topping single for the R&B/Disco band from Hialeah, FL led by keyboardist and lead singer Harry Wayne “KC” Casey. Casey and Finch write the song as a tribute to a Miami radio DJ named Robert W. Walker who was instrumental in helping break the bands first chart topping single “Get Down Tonight”. On the LP, “Boogie” is paired together with “Keep It Comin’ Love” (#2 Pop, #1 R&B), with the two songs edited so that they segue into each and play as one long continuous song. “I’m Your Boogie Man” is issued as the second single from the bands fourth studio album “Part 3”. Entering the Hot 100 at #84 on February 26, 1977, it climbs to the top of the chart fourteen weeks later. “I’m Your Boogie Man” is also covered by White Zombie in 1996 for the soundtrack to “The Crow – City Of Angels”. The original version is featured in the film “Scary Movie” and its sequels, the comedy “Superbad”, as well as the 2011 action adventure film “Watchmen”.

Born on this day: January 31, 1951 – Singer, s…

Born on this day: January 31, 1951 – Singer, songwriter and producer KC of KC & The Sunshine Band (born Harry Wayne Casey in Opa-Locka, FL). Happy 67th Birthday, KC!!

On this day in music history: January 5, 1980 …

On this day in music history: January 5, 1980 – “Please Don’t Go” by KC & The Sunshine Band hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 1 week. Written by Harry Wayne Casey and Richard Finch, it is the fifth and final chart topping single for the R&B/Disco band from Hialeah, FL. Marking a dramatic shift away from their classic uptempo dance sound, the lush ballad is issued as the second single from the bands’ sixth album “Do You Wanna Go Party?”. Released in July of 1979, the single begins a very slow ascent up the chart. Entering the Hot 100 at #86 on August 25, 1979, it climbs to the top of the chart nineteen weeks later.  Taking nearly five months to the reach the summit, it makes “Please” one of the slowest climbing singles to ever reach the top of the Billboard Hot 100. “Please Don’t Go” is also the first number one single of the 1980’s, temporarily interrupting Rupert Holmes’ three week run at the top with “Escape (The Pina Colada Song)”. “Please Don’t Go” becomes a hit again in 1992, when it is covered by British dance pop group K.W.S. (#1 UK Pop, #6 US Pop), changing the pop ballad to an uptempo dance track.

On this day in music history: November 22, 197…

On this day in music history: November 22, 1975 – “That’s The Way (I Like It)” by KC & The Sunshine Band hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 2 weeks (non-consecutive), also topping the R&B singles chart for 1 week on November 29, 1975. Written by Harry Wayne Casey and Richard Finch, it is the second consecutive number one single for the R&B band from Hialeah , FL. Knowing instinctively that a little controversy can be good for anyone’s career, KC and his songwriting partner and band mate Rick Finch, turn to subject matter of a more carnal nature for their next big hit.The trademark “ah-ha, ah-ha” refrain in “That’s The Way (I Like It)” are originally recorded as sensual moans and groans, but is given a more “benign” vocalization when the vocals are re-recorded. Issued as the third single from their self-titled second album in October of 1975,  it takes off even faster than its predecessor “Get Down Tonight”. Entering the Hot 100 at #50 on October 25, 1975, it rockets to the top of the chart just four weeks later. “That’s The Way” holds the top spot for one week, then is bumped from the pole position by the Silver Convention’s “Fly Robin Fly” for three weeks. Slipping back as far as #4, the single regains its bullet (signifying upward chart momentum), leaping back to the number one spot for one more week on December 20, 1975. One of the quintessential songs of the Disco Era, “That’s The Way (I Like It)” has been covered several times over the years by different artists, including versions by Giorgio Moroder, Dead Or Alive and by The Spin Doctors and Biz Markie for the film “Space Jam”.