Category: glam rock

On this day in music history: May 20, 1976 – &…

On this day in music history: May 20, 1976 – “Changesonebowie”, the eleventh album by David Bowie is released. It is the first compilation of Bowie’s hits on RCA Records from 1969 to 1976. The album also marks the first appearance of the track “John I’m Only Dancing” on an album. The song had been previously issued as a stand alone single in September of 1972. The first 1,000 copies of the UK LP have the “sax version” of the song, a re-recorded version cut in January of 1973. It issued as a single in the UK in April of 1973, using the same catalog number as the first pressing. The compilation subsequently switches out the “sax version” with the original release on future pressings. “Ziggy Stardust” is also issued as a single A-side in tandem with the compilations release to help promote it. “Changesone” is also briefly reissued on CD in 1985 by RCA, but is quickly withdrawn after Bowie acquires the rights to his master recordings. The album also spawns a sequel compilation titled “Changestwobowie” released in November of 1981. After both titles are deleted, another Bowie hits album titled “Changesbowie” featuring tracks from both albums with songs from the “Let’s Dance” and “Tonight” albums (originally released on EMI-America Records) is released in 1990, while Bowie’s catalog is distributed by Rykodisc. It too is deleted when the Bowie’s catalog is licensed to EMI Records worldwide. On May 20, 2016, the album is reissued on vinyl for the first time in over two decades, to commemorate the fortieth anniversary of its original release. Parlophone/WMG presses the new reissue on black and limited edition clear 180 gram vinyl. “Changesonebowie” peaks at number two on the UK album chart, number ten on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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twixnmix: David Bowie and his wife Angie B…

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David Bowie and his wife Angie Bowie photographed by Terry O’Neill, circa 1973.

Did you know that rock star wife Angela Bowi…

Did you know that rock star wife Angela Bowie – also known as “Jipp Jones” – once auditioned for the lead role in Wonder Woman? Although her own reports claim that Lynda Carter got the role, timing and historical fact-checking show that Bowie actually auditioned for the first Wonder Woman telefilm, which starred Cathy Lee Crosby.

Bowie’s first public discussion of the Wonder Woman audition was on The Tonight Show, in an episode originally aired on 11-16-1973, with the guests Dinah Shore, Joan Rivers, Angela Bowie, and Ashley Montagu. According to the official Johnny Carson website, Bowie discussed “Loving America, being the wife of rock star David Bowie, the Royal Wedding being boring, and their Zowie.”

In addition to her appearance on The Tonight Show, Bowie’s audition was mentioned in the Feb. 11, 1974 issue of Newsweek, in which it was reported that Angela Bowie had been considered for the role of Wonder Woman for an upcoming ABC-TV movie but lost the part for her refusal to wear a bra.

The rock magazine Rock Scene (May-June 1974, pg 37) also did a one-page photo spread.

Source: Wonder Woman Museum

On this day in music history: April 24, 1974 -…

On this day in music history: April 24, 1974 – “Diamond Dogs”, the eighth studio album by David Bowie is released. Produced by David Bowie, it is recorded at Olympic and Island Studios in London and Ludolf Studios in Hilversum, NL from October 1973 – February 1974. Following the covers album “Pin-Ups”, David Bowie begins writing songs for a proper follow up to his previous release “Aladdin Sane”. Told from the perspective of the character “Halloween Jack”, “Diamond Dogs” is a concept album consisting of songs influenced by George Orwell’s “1984” and Bowie’s vision of a post-apocalyptic world. It also marks the end of Bowie’s glam rock phase of his career (following the retirement of his “Ziggy Stardust” persona), as the scene reaches its zenith. Working with a new group of musicians that include Herbie Flowers (bass), Earl Slick, Alan Parker (guitars), Mike Garson (keyboards), Tony Newman and Aynsley Dunbar (drums), it’s Bowie’s first album to not feature the Spiders From Mars Band. The albums original cover artwork featuring the singer as a half-man/half dog hybrid (with genitalia exposed) stirs up controversy. The cover is quickly recalled and reprinted with the offending image airbrushed out. The original recalled album cover quickly becomes a prized and highly valuable collector’s item. The album spins off the single (two in the UK ) “Rebel Rebel” (#5 UK, #64 US Pop), becoming one of Bowie’s signature songs. It also features other classics including “1984” (later covered by Tina Turner), “Big Brother” and the title track. Reissued numerous times since making its CD debut in the mid 80’s, the album is most recently remastered in 2016 on CD and 180 gram vinyl. It is reissued as part of the box set “Who Can I Be Now?: 1974 – 1976”. “Diamond Dogs” hits number one on the UK album chart, peaking at number five on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

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twixnmix:David Bowie with his wife Angie and t…

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David Bowie with his wife Angie and their son Zowie (Duncan Jones) at the Amstel Hotel in Amsterdam,

February 1974.

twixnmix:David Bowie with his wife Angie and t…

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David Bowie with his wife Angie and their son Zowie (Duncan Jones) at the Amstel Hotel in Amsterdam,

February 1974.

On this day in music history: April 13, 1973 -…

On this day in music history: April 13, 1973 – “Aladdin Sane”, the sixth album by David Bowie is released. Produced by Ken Scott and David Bowie, it is recorded at Trident Studios in London, and RCA Studios in New York City and Nashville, TN from October 6, 1972 – January 24, 1973. Issued as the follow up to his watershed album “The Rise And Fall Of Ziggy Stardust And The Spiders From Mars”, the LP’s title is a pun on the term “a lad insane”. Bowie records the album in between US tour dates in support of the “Ziggy Stardust” album. Featuring a harder rock edge than the previous album, it reflects the manic atmosphere in which it was created. It spins off four singles in the UK (two in the US) including “The Jean Genie” (#2 UK, #71 US Pop) and “Drive In Saturday” (#3 UK). The albums iconic cover shot (taken by photographer Brian Duffy, and designed by graphic artist Freddie Burretti), featuring a head shot of Bowie in his Ziggy Stardust persona with a lightning bolt painted on his face, become among the most recognizable and parodied in rock music history. Reissued numerous times over the years, the album is most recently remastered in 2015 as part of the “Five Years – 1969 – 1973” box set on vinyl and CD. To commemorate the forty fifth anniversary of its release, “Sane” is released as a limited edition 180 gram LP, pressed on silver vinyl on April 13, 2018. “Aladdin Sane” hits number one on the UK album chart, peaking at number seventeen on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

Help support the Behind The Grooves music blog with a donation by clicking on the link at: PayPal.Me/jharris1228

twixnmix: David Bowie and his wife Angie Bow…

twixnmix:

David Bowie and his wife Angie Bowie photographed by Terry O’Neill, circa 1973.

Born on this day: March 2, 1942 – Singer, song…

Born on this day: March 2, 1942 – Singer, songwriter and musician Lou Reed (born Lewis Allan Reed in Brooklyn, NY). Happy Birthday to this visionary rock icon on what would have been his 77th Birthday.

On this day in music history: February 25, 197…

On this day in music history: February 25, 1973 – “Billion Dollar Babies”, the sixth studio album by Alice Cooper is released. Produced by Bob Ezrin, it is recorded at the Galecie Estate in Greenwich, CT, The Record Plant in New York City, and Morgan Studios in London, UK from August 1972 – January 1973. Reveling in the success of their previous album “School’s Out”, the follow up is influenced by what Alice and the band experience in the period after their commercial breakthrough, along with the macabre “shock rock” that has brought them fame and notoriety. It becomes their most successful album and is supported by an elaborately staged tour that cements their reputation as a top draw live act. The album spins off four singles including “No More Mr. Nice Guy” (#25 Pop) and the title track (#57 Pop). The original LP package is designed to look like an over sized snakeskin wallet (with embossing and textured to simulate real snakeskin), and comes with insert of a giant “billion dollar bill” that features a picture of the band on it. The album is remastered and reissued on CD in 2001, as double disc deluxe edition, with the second disc including several live recordings from the tour in support of “Babies”. Many of these bonus tracks have previously appeared on a DVD-A disc of the album released the previous year, featuring a new 5.1 multi-channel remix, rather than the original quadraphonic stereo mix issued in  1974. The album is also reissued on 180 gram vinyl by Rhino Records in 2010. Another LP release pressed on marbled green, yellow and orange vinyl limited to 3,000 copies is released in October of 2016, as part of Rhino’s “Rocktober” reissue series. The limited pressing sells out quickly, turning into a sought after collector’s item. “Billion Dollar Babies” spends one week at number one on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.