Category: g-funk

On this day in music history: June 7, 1994 – &…

On this day in music history: June 7, 1994 – “Regulate…G Funk Era”, the debut album by Warren G is released. Produced by Warren G., it is recorded at Track Record Recording Studios in North Hollywood, CA, Saturn Sound in Studio City, CA, Sound City Studios in Van Nuys, CA and G-Child Studios in Long Beach, CA from Mid 1993 – Mid 1994. Born Warren Griffin III in Long Beach, CA in 1970, he becomes involved in music in his teens with childhood friend Nate Hale (aka “Nate Dogg”). Along with Nate’s cousin Calvin Broadus (aka “Snoop Dogg”), the trio form the rap group 213. The younger stepbrother of Dr. Dre, Warren plays a home produced demo by 213 at a party attended by Dre. He immediately takes notice of Snoop and offers him a chance to record with him. With Snoop Dogg becoming a huge star, 213 breaks up. At this time, Dre introduces Warren to “Boyz In The Hood” director John Singleton, who is working on his second film “Poetic Justice”. Singleton asks Griffin to write and produce a song for the soundtrack, and Warren comes up with “Indo Smoke” featuring rapper Mista Grimm and Nate Dogg. The song is a hit, and right on the heels of that success, the producer receives another offer to contribute to another soundtrack. For the film “Above The Rim”, Warren G. and Nate Dogg come up with the “Regulate” (#7 R&B, #2 Pop, #1 Rap). Centered around a sample of Michael McDonald’s solo smash “I Keep Forgettin’” and featuring Nate Dogg’s laid back vocals as the counterpoint to Warren’s rap, it is an immediate smash. With labels clamoring to sign him, Griffin signs with Def Jam Records. With the Double Platinum selling “Regulate” tearing up the charts during the late Spring of 1994, anticipation for Warren G’s album is high. Released just as the first single is peaking on the charts, the album hits record stores. Moving nearly 200,000 copies in its first week, the album becomes “the Hip Hop album” of that Summer, selling more than three million copies in the US. It spins off two more singles including “This DJ” (#14 R&B, #9 Pop, #3 Rap) and “Do You See” (#45 R&B, #42 Pop, #11 Rap). Though not released as a single, a slightly different mix of the song “So Many Ways” appears in the action comedy “Bad Boys” in 1995. The “Regulate” album is remastered and reissued in 2007 as a two CD Special Edition, with the second disc featuring six bonus tracks including remixes of the three singles and an instrumental version of “What’s Next”. Issued on a limited basis on vinyl back in 1994, it is remastered and reissued in Europe in 2000 and again in 2005 as double vinyl LP. A single vinyl pressing is also released in 2015. “Regulate…G Funk Era” spends three weeks at number one on the Billboard R&B album chart, peaking at number two on the Top 200, and is certified 3x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: June 7, 1994 – &…

On this day in music history: June 7, 1994 – “Regulate…G Funk Era”, the debut album by Warren G. is released. Produced by Warren G., it is recorded at Track Record Recording Studios in North Hollywood, CA, Saturn Sound in Studio City, CA, Sound City Studios in Van Nuys, CA and G-Child Studios in Long Beach, CA from Mid 1993 – Mid 1994. Born Warren Griffin III in Long Beach, CA in 1970, he becomes involved in music in his teens with childhood friend Nate Hale (aka “Nate Dogg”). Along with Nate’s cousin Calvin Broadus (aka “Snoop Dogg”), the trio form the rap group 213. The younger stepbrother of rapper and producer Dr. Dre, Warren plays a home produced demo by 213 at a party attended by Dre. He immediately takes notice of Snoop and offers him a chance to record with him. With Snoop Dogg becoming a huge star after linking up with Dr. Dre, 213 breaks up. At this time, Dre introduces Warren to “Boyz In The Hood” director John Singleton, who is working on his second film “Poetic Justice”. Singleton asks Griffin to write and produce a song for the soundtrack, and Warren comes up with the song “Indo Smoke” featuring rapper Mista Grimm and Nate Dogg. The song is a hit, and right on the heels of that success, the producer receives another offer to contribute to another film soundtrack. For the film “Above The Rim”, Warren G. and Nate Dogg come up with the “Regulate” (#7 R&B, #2 Pop, #1 Rap). Centered around a sample of Michael McDonald’s solo smash “I Keep Forgettin’” and featuring Nate Dogg’s laid back vocals as the counterpoint to Warren’s rap, the song is an immediate smash. With record labels clamoring to sign him, Griffin signs with Def Jam Records. With the Double Platinum selling  "Regulate" tearing up the charts during the late Spring of 1994, anticipation for Warren G’s album is high. Released just as the first single is nearing its peak on the charts, the album “Regulate…G Funk Era” hits record stores. Moving nearly 200,000 copies in its first week, the album becomes “the Hip Hop album” of that Summer, selling more than three million copies in the US. It spins off two more singles including “This DJ” (#14 R&B, #9 Pop, #3 Rap) and “Do You See” (#45 R&B, #42 Pop, #11 Rap). Though not released as a single, a slightly different mix of the song “So Many Ways” appears in the action comedy “Bad Boys” in 1995. The “Regulate” album is remastered and reissued in 2007 as a two CD Special Edition, with the second disc featuring six bonus tracks including remixes of the three singles and an instrumental version of “What’s Next”. Issued on a limited basis on vinyl back in 1994, it is remastered and reissued in Europe in 2000 and again in 2005 as double vinyl LP. A single vinyl pressing is also released in 2015. “Regulate…G Funk Era” spends three weeks at number one on the Billboard R&B album chart, peaking at number two on the Top 200, and is certified 3x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: February 22, 199…

On this day in music history: February 22, 1990 – “Livin’ Like Hustlers”, the debut album by Above The Law is released. Produced by Above the Law, Dr. Dre and Laylaw, it is recorded at Audio Achievements in Torrance, CA from Mid – Late 1989. Originally from Pomona, CA, Above The Law consists of group members Cold 187um (Gregory Hutchinson), Go Mack (Arthur Goodman), KMG the Illustrator (Kevin Gulley) and DJ Total K-Oss (Anthony Stewart). The group are signed to Eazy-E’s Ruthless Records after the label secures a distribution deal CBS subsidiary Epic Records. ATL begin work on their debut album with Dr. Dre and Laylaw co-producing. Less than a year and a half after NWA’s landmark debut “Straight Outta Compton”, as well as solo albums for Eazy-E (“Eazy-Duz-It”) and The D.O.C. (“No One Can Do It Better”), Above The Law’s album represents another leap forward in Dre’s work as a producer. Anchored by Cold 187’s unique and forceful rhyming style, and with tracks sampled from a diverse array of sources, it stands out immediately from anything else happening in hip hop at the time. The ATL project serves as the prototype for what becomes known as the “G-Funk” sound that makes Dr. Dre a superstar on his solo debut “The Chronic”. The album is proceeded by the first single “Murder Rap” (#1 Rap) in January of 1990. Based around loops Quincy Jones’ classic television theme “Ironside Theme”, as well as backward masked drums from James Brown’s ubiquitous “Funky Drummer”, punctuated with Chuck D’s voice taken from “Bring The Noise” Flavor Flav’s from “Cold Lampin’ With Flavor” and Ice Cube’s from “Straight Outta Compton” (the latter two being the source of the songs title), its ominous and mesmerizing combination of funky noise and hard rhymes hits immediately with rap music fans. The album also spins off a second single with “Untouchable” (#1 Rap), shortly afterward, sampling Young-Holt Unlimited’s darkly funky instrumental cover of The Doors’ “Light My Fire”. The latter is also released with a dramatically different remix by Dre that competes with the original album version in popularity. “Hustlers” becomes an instant classic at street level and is considered an important release in establishing the west coast rap sound as an influential and vital musical force.

Not long after the albums’ release, the song “Freedom Of Speech is featured in the film "Pump Up The Volume” on its soundtrack. “Murder Rap” later used in the video game “Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas” and in the film “Pineapple Express”.

“Livin’ Like Hustlers” peaks at number fourteen on the Billboard R&B album chart, number seventy five on the Top 200, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

Born on this day: February 18, 1965 – Producer…

Born on this day: February 18, 1965 – Producer, rapper and entrepreneur Dr. Dre (born Andre Romelle Young) in Compton, CA. Happy 53rd Birthday, Dre!!!

On this day in music history: December 15, 199…

On this day in music history: December 15, 1992 – “The Chronic”, the debut solo album by Dr. Dre is released. Produced by Dr. Dre, it is recorded at Death Row Studios in Los Angeles, CA from June – November 1992. The album is first release from the former producer of NWA, and introduces rapper Snoop Doggy Dogg (aka “Snoop Dogg”, aka “Snoop Lion”) to the public. The title comes from a particularly potent strain of marijuana, also being referred to subtly on the album’s cover artwork, which is modeled after Zig Zag brand rolling papers. It receives great acclaim both within and outside the rap music community upon its release. It establishes Dre’s trademark “G-Funk” sound with a wide mainstream audience, and goes on to be one of the most popular and influential albums of the 90’s and beyond. It spins off three singles including “Nuthin’ But A G Thang” (#1 R&B, #2 Pop) and “Dre Day” (#6 R&B, #8 Pop). Dre wins a Grammy Award for Best Rap Solo Performance for “Let Me Ride” in 1994. The album is remastered and reissued on CD in 2002, with enhanced content, including the music video for “Dre Day”. Originally issued on vinyl as a single LP, it is also remastered and reissued in 2002 as a double LP set by Simply Vinyl for improved fidelity. It is remastered and reissued a second time in 2009 under the title “The Chronic Re-Lit & From The Vault”, with slightly altered cover artwork, and with two previously unreleased tracks featuring Snoop Dogg and The Lady Of Rage are added. A second edition features bonus DVD with music videos, interviews, promotional spots and DVD-ROM content, and is sold exclusively through big box retailer Wal-Mart. “The Chronic” spends eight weeks (non-consecutive) at number one on the Billboard R&B album chart, peaking at number three on the Top 200, and is certified 4x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: November 16, 1999 – “2001…

On this day in music history: November 16, 1999 – “2001 (aka “The Chronic 2001”)“, the second album by Dr. Dre is released. Produced by Dr. Dre, Mel-Man and Lord Finesse, it is recorded at Dre’s Crib in Los Angeles, CA, Larrabee Sound Studios, A&M Studios in Hollywood, CA, Can-Am Recorders in Tarzana, CA, Encore Studios in Burbank, CA, Record One, Los Angeles in Sherman Oaks, CA, Skip Saylor Recording in Northridge, CA, Sierra Sonics Studios in Reno, NV and D&D Studios in New York City from Early 1998 – Mid 1999. Making a huge impact with his landmark solo debut “The Chronic” in late 1992, nearly seven years passes before the producer and rapper follows it up. In spite of the prolonged silence between albums, Dre is far from idle during this time. He produces protege Snoop Dogg’s multi-Platinum debut “Doggystyle”, tracks for the soundtracks of “Murder Was The Case”, “Above The Rim” and “Friday”. Dre also issues the compilation album “Dre Presents The Aftermath”, appears on Blackstreet’s Grammy winning chart topper “No Diggity” as well producing tracks for 2Pac and for Emimem’s major label debut album. By 1998, Dre begins working on his long awaited sophomore release. The producer pulls together an elite crew of talent including Snoop Dogg, Nate Dogg, Kurupt, Xzibit, Eminem, Devin The Dude, Knoc-turn’al, King T, Defari, Kokane, Hittman, and Mary J. Blige. Any talk of Dre having lost his touch is quickly silenced with the release of the first single “Still D.R.E.” featuring Snoop Dogg (#11 Rap, #32 R&B, #93 Pop), anchored by samples of ominous sounding strings and a piano vamp played by keyboardist and producer Scott Storch (Beyonce, 50 Cent, The Roots). The album is an immediate hit, spinning off two more singles including “Forgot About Dre” (#14 R&B, #25 Pop) and “The Next Episode” (#11 R&B, #23 Pop). Other tracks including “The Watcher”, “F*** You” and “Xxplosive” also become favorites, with the track from the latter being sampled as basis for the hit remix version of Erykah Badu’s “Bag Lady” (#1 R&B, #6 Pop) in 2000. “2001” is nominated for three Grammy Awards, winning Best Rap Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal for “Forgot About Dre” in 2001. “2001 (aka “The Chronic 2001”)“ spends four weeks (non-consecutive) at number one on the Billboard R&B album chart, peaking at number two on the Top 200, and is certified 6x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.