Category: Fidel Castro

twixnmix:

Fidel Castro meets

Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser

at the Hotel Theresa in Harlem, September 1960.

Che Guevara photographed by René Burri, 1963.

twixnmix:

Fidel Castro, Che Guevara and

Antonio Núñez Jiménez

playing golf

at Colina Villareal

in Havana, March 1961. 

Photos by Alberto Korda 

Fidel Castro at the Hotel Theresa in Harlem, September 1960.

After Malcolm X helped arrange his stay

in Harlem, Castro had a series of meetings held at the

Hotel Theresa.

Harlem was a more gracious host to Castro than high-society Midtown had been. Crowds gathered outside the Hotel Theresa, as the honored guest held court in his room. He received official visits from foreign leaders—like Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev, Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser, Indian Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru, and New York NAACP President Joseph Overton.

When Castro was not invited to a luncheon given by Dwight D. Eisenhower for other Latin American leaders, he put together a lunch for the Hotel Theresa’s working-class black employees. The luncheon made for some great photo opportunities, giving Castro a chance to re-emphasize his preference for Harlem and its inhabitants over the fancier parts of Manhattan.

Fidel Castro photographed by Lester Cole, 1959.

Che Guevara and Fidel Castro during

The Ernest Hemingway International Billfishing Tournament in Cuba on May 13, 1960.

Castro won the event, he caught a 54 pound marlin fish.

Fidel Castro meets

Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser

at the Hotel Theresa in Harlem, September 1960.

Che Guevara on the CBS current affairs program ‘Face the Nation’ in New York on December 13, 1964. 

While in New York, Malcolm X invited

Che Guevara

to come to the Audubon Ballroom to speak to a meeting of the OAAU [Organization of Afro-American Unity]. Che initially accepted the invitation but later concluded, as he wrote in a message that Malcolm read to the audience, that security “conditions are not good for [my participation in] this meeting.” Che added: “Receive the warm salutations of the Cuban people and especially those of Fidel, who remembers enthusiastically his visit to Harlem a few years ago. United we will win.”

“I love a revolutionary,” Malcolm told the audience at the Audubon that night, as he prepared to read Che’s note. “And one of the most revolutionary men in this country right now was going to come out here … but he thought better of it.” Malcolm cautioned participants never to let anyone choose their friends for them. “I don’t,” Malcolm said. “And you shouldn’t… You and I should practice the habit of weighing people and weighing situations and weighing groups and weighing governments for ourselves.”

(Excerpt from Malcolm X, Black Liberation, and the Road to Workers Power)

Fidel Castro, Che Guevara and

Antonio Núñez Jiménez

playing golf

at Colina Villareal

in Havana, March 1961. 

Photos by Alberto Korda 

Fidel Castro and Malcolm X photographed by Carl Nesfield at the Hotel Theresa in Harlem on September 20, 1960.

Fidel Castro came to New York for the 15th Session of the General Assembly of the United Nations. He and his delegation were initially staying in Midtown.

Soon, tabloids were reporting that these “uncouth primitives” had “killed, plucked, and cooked chickens in their rooms at the Shelbourne and extinguished cigars on expensive carpets.” The Cuban delegation found itself temporarily homeless when the manager asked them to deposit a $20,000 security fee in cash, in order to continue their stay.

Insulted, they looked around for other lodgings, at one point threatening to pitch tents on the grounds in Central Park and the UN. Numerous hotels either refused accommodations or imposed costly deposits. Malcolm X reached out to Castro and arranged for his delegation to lodge at the Hotel Theresa in Harlem. 

Castro moved into

the Hotel Theresa

past midnight on September 20, he met with Malcolm shortly after. Malcolm told Castro, “Downtown for you, it was ice, uptown it is warm.” Castro

smiled appreciatively, “yes, we feel very warm here.” Malcolm added, “I think you will find the people in Harlem are not so addicted to the propaganda they put out downtown.” Castro responded, “I admire this. I have seen how it is possible for propaganda to make changes in people. Your people live here and are faced with this propaganda all the time and yet, they understand. This is very interesting.” “There are 20 million of us,” said Malcolm, “and we always understand.”

“Premier Castro has come out against lynching, which is more than [U.S. President] Eisenhower has done.

Castro has also taken a more open stand for civil rights for Black Cubans. He [Eisenhower] wants to see Castro as a Muslim,” Malcolm told the press after their meeting.