Category: delta blues

The Mississippi Blues Trail

  1. Robert Johnson (Greenwood, MS)
  2. Ike Turner (Clarksdale, MS)
  3. Howlin’ Wolf (West Point, MS)
  4. B.B. King (Berclair, MS)
  5. Otis Rush (Philadelphia, MS)
  6. Son House (Tunica, MS)
  7. Muddy Waters (Rolling Fork, MS)
  8. Albert King (Indianola, MS)
  9. Bo Diddley (McComb, MS)
  10. Elvis Presley (Tupelo, MS)

On this day in music history: October 23, 2001 – “Screamin’ And Hollerin’ The Blues: The Worlds Of Charley Patton” by Charley Patton is released. Compilation Producer: Dean Blackwood. The seven CD, one hundred forty four track box set collects the complete works of legendary Mississippi Delta blues musician Charley Patton (1891 – 1934) recorded for the Paramount and Vocalion labels between June 1929 and February 1934. The compilation has its genesis in a biography written by Patton biographer and delta blues historian John Fahey in 1970. Having only recorded for a brief five years before dying prematurely at the age of forty three, Patton is largely forgotten about, other than by blues historians and fans who are aware of his legend. With the assistance of business partner Dean Blackwood, Fahey set about putting together the definitive word on Patton, forming the label Revenant Records. The process of compiling the recordings proves to be a very long and arduous process. The bluesman’s original label Paramount Records being a relatively low budget operation, goes out of business during The Depression in the 1930’s. All of the original metal masters of Charley Patton’s recordings are destroyed or sold for scrap after their demise. Paramount’s records were pressed on relatively poor quality shellac 78 RPM discs, with even the best copies exhibiting prodigious surface noise. Nearly eighty years later, only handful of surviving copies, or just one original copy remains, often in rough condition. With minimal clean up (to prevent losing too much of the recordings original sonics) and speed correction, they are carefully digitally remastered for the best possible sound quality. Sadly, John Fahey passes away in February of 2001 eight months before the set is released, which is dedicated to his memory. The lavishly produced set comes in a 11" x 13" x 3.5" cloth-bound slipcase box (with title graphics embossed in gold ink), with a 78 RPM single binder housed inside. Inside the front cover is a paperback copy of Fahey’s biography on Charley Patton with an extensively annotated one hundred twenty eight page book, with reproductions of original newspaper ads advertising Patton’s singles. The CD’s themselves attached to 10" cardboard replicas of Paramount and Vocalion label 78’s, and stored in reproductions of the original company paper sleeves. The box also comes with a complete set of Paramount and Vocalion label singles printed on stickers. In spite of its $200 plus price tag, it is released to an enthusiastic response by blues aficionados, and actually sells out, turning it an instant collectors item. “Screamin’ And Hollerin The Blues” wins three Grammy Awards in 2003 for Best Historical Album, Best Album Notes and Best Boxed Or Special Limited Edition Package.

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Born on this day: May 8, 1911 – Iconic blues singer, songwriter and guitarist Robert Johnson (born Robert Leroy Johnson in Hazlehurst, MS). Happy Birthday to one of the most influential musicians of the twentieth century born one hundred eight years ago today.

Help support the Behind The Grooves music blog with a donation by clicking on the link at: PayPal.Me/jharris1228

On this day in music history: October 23, 2001 – “Screamin’ And Hollerin’ The Blues: The Worlds Of Charley Patton” by Charley Patton is released. Compilation Producer: Dean Blackwood. The seven CD, one hundred forty four track box set collects the complete works of legendary Mississippi Delta blues musician Charley Patton (1891 – 1934) recorded for the Paramount and Vocalion labels between June 1929 and February 1934. The compilation has its genesis in a biography written by Patton biographer and delta blues historian John Fahey in 1970. Having only recorded for a brief five years before dying prematurely at the age of forty three, Patton is largely forgotten about, other than by blues historians and fans who are aware of his legend. With the assistance of business partner Dean Blackwood, Fahey set about putting together the definitive word on Patton, forming the label Revenant Records. The process of compiling the recordings proves to be a very long and arduous process. The bluesman’s original label Paramount Records being a relatively low budget operation, goes out of business during The Depression in the 1930’s. All of the original metal masters of Charley Patton’s recordings are destroyed or sold for scrap after their demise. Paramount’s records were pressed on relatively poor quality shellac 78 RPM discs, with even the best copies exhibiting prodigious surface noise. Nearly eighty years later, only handful of surviving copies, or just one original copy remains, often in rough condition. With minimal clean up (to prevent losing too much of the recordings original sonics) and speed correction, they are carefully digitally remastered for the best possible sound quality. Sadly, John Fahey passes away in February of 2001 eight months before the set is released, which is dedicated to his memory. The lavishly produced set comes in a 11" x 13" x 3.5" cloth-bound slipcase box (with title graphics embossed in gold ink), with a 78 RPM single binder housed inside. Inside the front cover is a paperback copy of Fahey’s biography on Charley Patton with an extensively annotated one hundred twenty eight page book, with reproductions of original newspaper ads advertising Patton’s singles. The CD’s themselves attached to 10" cardboard replicas of Paramount and Vocalion label 78’s, and stored in reproductions of the original company paper sleeves. The box also comes with a complete set of Paramount and Vocalion label singles printed on stickers. In spite of its $200 plus price tag, it is released to an enthusiastic response by blues aficionados, and actually sells out, turning it an instant collectors item. “Screamin’ And Hollerin The Blues” wins three Grammy Awards in 2003 for Best Historical Album, Best Album Notes and Best Boxed Or Special Limited Edition Package.

Born on this day: May 8, 1911 – Iconic blues singer, songwriter and guitarist Robert Johnson (born Robert Leroy Johnson in Hazlehurst, MS). Happy Birthday to one of the most influential musicians of the twentieth century born one hundred seven years ago today.

On this day in music history: October 23, 2001 – “Screamin’ And Hollerin’ The Blues: The Worlds Of Charley Patton” by Charley Patton is released. Compilation Producer: Dean Blackwood. The seven CD, one hundred forty four track box set collects the complete works of legendary Mississippi Delta blues musician Charley Patton (1891 – 1934) recorded for the Paramount and Vocalion labels between June 1929 and February 1934. The compilation has its genesis in a biography written by Patton biographer and delta blues historian John Fahey in 1970. Having only recorded for a brief five years before dying prematurely at the age of forty three, Patton is largely forgotten about, other than by blues historians and fans who are aware of his legend. With the assistance of business partner Dean Blackwood, Fahey set about putting together the definitive word on Patton, forming the label Revenant Records. The process of compiling the recordings proves to be a very long and arduous process. The bluesman’s original label Paramount Records being a relatively low budget operation, goes out of business during The Depression in the 1930’s, and all of the original metal masters of Charley Patton’s recordings are destroyed or sold for scrap after their demise. All of Paramount’s records were pressed on relatively poor quality shellac 78 RPM discs. Nearly eighty years later, only handful of surviving copies or just one original copy remains, often in rough condition. With minimal clean up (to prevent losing too much of the recordings original sonics) and speed correction, they are carefully digitally remastered for the best possible sound quality. Sadly, John Fahey passes away in February of 2001 eight months before the set is released, which is dedicated to his memory. The lavishly produced set comes in a 11″ x 13″ x 3.5″ cloth-bound slipcase box (with title graphics embossed in gold ink), with a 78 RPM single binder housed inside. Inside the front cover is a paperback copy of Fahey’s biography on Charley Patton with an extensively annotated one hundred twenty eight page book, with reproductions of original newspaper ads advertising Patton’s singles. The CD’s themselves attached to 10″ cardboard replicas of Paramount and Vocalion label 78’s, and stored in reproductions of the original company paper sleeves. The box also comes with a complete set of Paramount and Vocalion label singles printed on stickers. In spite of its $200 plus price tag, it is released to an enthusiastic response by blues aficionados, and actually sells out, turning it an instant collectors item. “Screamin’ And Hollerin The Blues” wins three Grammy Awards in 2003 for Best Historical Album, Best Album Notes and Best Boxed Or Special Limited Edition Package.