Category: chicago

On this day in music history: July 10, 1972 – …

On this day in music history: July 10, 1972 – “Chicago V”, the fifth album by Chicago is released. Produced by James William Guericio, it is recorded at Columbia Recording Studios in New York City from September 20 – 29, 1971. The album is the bands first single LP release following their previous four (three were 2 LP sets, followed by a 4 LP live box set), instead opting for shorter songs rather than extended pieces and side long suites. Robert Lamm will be the dominant creative driving force of the album, writing eight of its ten songs. Recorded in a relatively brief nine days of studio time, it spins off two hit singles including “Saturday In The Park” (#3 Pop) and “Dialogue Pts. I & II” (# 24 Pop), becoming their most successful album to date. It becomes Chicago’s first chart topping album, spending nine weeks at number one on the Billboard Top 200 beginning on August 19, 1972. It is remastered and reissued on CD in 2003 by Rhino Records, with three additional bonus tracks. It is also issued as a high resolution DVD-A disc, featuring a 5.1 surround mix. The 5.1 mix is also reissued by Rhino in Japan in 2011, with a 180 gram vinyl LP reissue released by Friday Music in 2012. “Chicago V” is certified 2x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: June 14, 1976 – …

On this day in music history: June 14, 1976 – “Chicago X”, the tenth album by Chicago is released. Produced by James William Guercio, it is recorded at the Caribou Ranch in Nederland, CO from March – April 1976. Taking a year and a half off from recording, the band return to the studio rejuvenated after a five year long non stop cycle of recording albums followed by extensive tours to support them. The albums biggest hit, the Peter Cetera penned and sung ballad “If You Leave Me Now” (#1 Pop) is nearly left off of the new record. While half of the band like the song, the others feel that the lush string laden track sounds out of place on the album. Producer Guercio overrules the others and it is slotted into the final running order. It becomes Chicago’s first number one pop single, topping the charts in the US and the UK, as well as winning two Grammy Awards including Best Pop Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocals in 1977. The album wins a third Grammy for its iconic cover artwork designed by John Berg of CBS Records’ art department, with the gatefold cover designed to look like a Hershey bar but with the trademark “Chicago®” logo on the front. “X” spins off two other singles including “Another Rainy Day in New York City” (#32 Pop), and “You Are On My Mind” (#49 Pop). It is remastered and reissued on CD in 2003 with two additional bonus tracks. Out of print on vinyl since the late 80’s, it is reissued as a 180 gram LP by Friday Music in 2016. “Chicago X” peaks at number three on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 2x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: June 7, 1982 – &…

On this day in music history: June 7, 1982 – “Chicago 16”, the fourteenth studio album (sixteenth overall) by Chicago is released. Produced by David Foster, is recorded at Bill Schnee Studios, The Record Plant, Davlen Studios, and Skyline Recording in Los Angeles, CA from January – April 1982. It is the veteran bands first release on Warner Bros after being unceremoniously dropped by their long time label Columbia Records the year before. It marks the beginning of a new era of commercial success for the band who had seen their commercial and chart fortunes decline following the death of original guitarist Terry Kath. Former Sons Of Champlin vocalist, keyboardist, and guitarist Bill Champlin also joins Chicago as full time member. Collaborating with producer and songwriter David Foster, the Canadian born musician plays a vital role in the veteran band’s re-birth. During this era, Chicago redefine themselves, maintaining some elements of their trademark sound, while also moving in a more pop/adult contemporary direction. The musical makeover returns them to chart prominence in a major way. The album spins off two singles including “Hard To Say I’m Sorry” (#1 Pop) from the film “Summer Lovers” and “Love Me Tomorrow” (#22 Pop). The success is a double edged as the hits and music videos make lead singer and bassist Peter Cetera the central focus of the band publicly, which causes internal friction within the band. “Chicago 16” peaks at number nine on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: May 14, 1984 – &…

On this day in music history: May 14, 1984 – “Chicago 17”, the seventeenth album by Chicago is released. Produced by David Foster, it is recorded at The Lighthouse in North Hollywood, CA, The Record Plant in Los Angeles, CA and Sunset Sound Studios in Hollywood, CA from Mid 1983 – Early 1984. Hitting the reset button on their career with “Chicago 16”, Chicago look to continue their new found success. Though the other band members are pleased with their renewed popularity, there also comes a dramatic shift in Chicago’s creative dynamic. With producer David Foster at the helm, greater focus is put on bassist and vocalist Peter Cetera and keyboardist and vocalist Bill Champlin. In their first era, Robert Lamm and James Pankow had a more dominant creative presence. They find their roles diminished further as Foster brings in additional musicians including Jeff Porcaro (Toto), John Robinson (Rufus), Carlos Vega (James Taylor) (drums), Paul Jackson, Jr., Michael Landau (guitars), and Paulinho Da Costa (percussion). Cetera dominates the album, vocally as well as co-writing five songs, with Lamm and Pankow co-writing one and two songs respectively. Though some long time fans are not happy with the decidedly slicker, more polished sound, it wins them a whole new fan base. “17” spins off four singles including “Stay The Night” (#16 Pop), “Hard Habit To Break” (#3 Pop and AC), “You’re The Inspiration” (#3 Pop, #1 AC) and “Along Comes A Woman” (#14 Pop, #25 AC). It is also released as a video album on laserdisc (two music videos, w/ the audio of the full album). Though it earns a pair of Grammy nominations and becomes Chicago’s biggest selling album, it also marks the end of Peter Cetera’s tenure in the band. The animosity created by Cetera becoming the public’s focus point, as well as taking more creative control, comes to a head in the Summer of 1985. He tells his band mates that he is not interesting in touring, but wants to record as a solo artist, and remain a member of Chicago. The other members flatly refuse, leading to Peter Cetera to quit after nearly eighteen years in the band. Sadly, the bad feelings between Cetera and his former band mates last to this day. The bassist refusing to perform at or attend the ceremony, when Chicago are finally inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame in 2016. Their first album to be simultaneously released on CD along with the vinyl and cassette formats, it is remastered and reissued in 2006, with one additional bonus track. It is also released as a high resolution SHM-CD by WMG Japan in 2010, with Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab reissuing it as a 24K gold CD in 2011. Out of print on vinyl since 1989, it is reissued as a 180 gram LP by Friday Music. “Chicago 17” peaks at number four on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 6x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: April 28, 1969 -…

On this day in music history: April 28, 1969 – “Chicago Transit Authority”, the debut album by the Chicago Transit Authority is released. Produced by James William Guercio, it is recorded at Columbia Recording Studios in New York City from January 27 – 30, 1969. Formed in 1967, the band are originally known as The Big Thing before changing their name to the Chicago Transit Authority in 1968. That same year, they meet record producer James William Guericio who also becomes their manager, helping them to secure a deal with Columbia Records. Relocating to Los Angeles, CA, they go through months of intensive rehearsals and writing sessions, before going to New York in early 1969 to record their first album. Recorded in just three days, they will have enough material for not only one, but two albums. CBS initially balks at the idea of releasing a two record set on new band. Insistent on releasing the album as it was originally conceived, the band and Guericio have to agree to take a cut in royalty payments, as well as allow the label to price the album at a slightly lower rate, than the normal list price for a double LP set. Once released, the twelve track double album initially gets off to a slow start, but finds success through heavy touring and support, from FM underground radio. It spins off four singles including “Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?” (#7 Pop) and “Beginnings” (#7 Pop). Reissued numerous times since its original release, most recently the album is remastered and reissued as a limited edition hybrid SACD by Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab. “CTA” is also reissued as a 180 double vinyl LP by Rhino in 2010 (along with a DVD-A disc featuring the original quadraphonic stereo mix in DTS surround sound), and by Friday Music in 2015. “Chicago Transit Authority” peaks at number seventeen on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 2x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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twixnmix: Boxer Joe Louis in Chicago, 1935. …

twixnmix:

Boxer Joe Louis in Chicago, 1935.

Joe Louis nicknamed the “Brown Bomber,” reigned as the world heavyweight champion from 1937 to 1949.

He

successfully

defended his title a record 25 times.

twixnmix: Boxer Joe Louis in Chicago, 1935. …

twixnmix:

Boxer Joe Louis in Chicago, 1935.

Joe Louis nicknamed the “Brown Bomber,” reigned as the world heavyweight champion from 1937 to 1949.

He

successfully

defended his title a record 25 times.

twixnmix: Muhammad Ali photographed by Thomas…

twixnmix:

Muhammad Ali photographed by Thomas Hoepker in Chicago, 1966.

twixnmix: Muhammad Ali photographed by Thomas…

twixnmix:

Muhammad Ali photographed by Thomas Hoepker in Chicago, 1966.

Rudolph Valentino with some adoring young fa…

Rudolph Valentino with some adoring young fans in Chicago, July 1926.