Category: andy warhol

Andy Warhol, Edie Sedgwick, Gerard Malanga and…

Andy Warhol, Edie Sedgwick, Gerard Malanga and Chuck Wein Photographed by David Bailey, 1965

Keith Haring, Andy Warhol, and Jean-Michel B…

Keith Haring, Andy Warhol, and Jean-Michel Basquiat at Warhol’s studio at 860 Broadway in New York City on April 23, 1984.

twixnmix: Andy Warhol inside his original s…

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Andy Warhol inside his original silver Factory at 47th St in New York City, 1965.  

Photos by Bob Adelman

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O.J. Simpson Polaroids by Andy Warhol, 1977.

twixnmix: Polaroids by Andy Warhol Bianca Jagg…

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Polaroids by Andy Warhol

Bianca Jagger (1971)

Valentino Garavani (1973)

Tina Turner (1974)

Pele (1977)

Liza

Minnelli (1978)

Diana Ross (1981)

Jean-Michel Basquiat (1983)

Grace Jones (1984)

Joan Collins (1985)

Keith Haring (1986)

Jean-Michel Basquiat at Madonna’s Like a Virgi…

Jean-Michel Basquiat at Madonna’s Like a Virgin record release party in New York City on November 12, 1984.

Photos by Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol and Edie Sedgwick at a party in Ne…

Andy Warhol and Edie Sedgwick at a party in New York City, 1965.   

Photos by Steve Schapiro

 

twixnmix: O.J. Simpson Polaroids by Andy Warho…

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O.J. Simpson Polaroids by Andy Warhol, 1977.

Madonna with Jean-Michel Basquiat and Keith Ha…

Madonna with Jean-Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring at the after party for The Virgin Tour in New York City on June 6, 1985. 

Photos by Andy Warhol

twixnmix: Jean-Michel Basquiat and Madonna pho…

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Jean-Michel Basquiat and Madonna photographed by Stephen Torton, 1982.

Madonna and Basquiat dated for a while, but his heroin addiction ended up pulling them apart. “He was an amazing man and deeply talented. I loved him,” she said. “When I broke up with him, he made me give all [his paintings] back to him. And then he painted over them black.” She regrets giving the art back, but felt pressured to do so since it was something he had created. (The Howard Stern Show, March 2015)

Madonna: “Basquiat was my boyfriend for a while, and I remember getting up in the middle of the night and he wouldn’t be in bed lying next to me; he’d be standing, painting, at four in the morning, this close to the canvas, in a trance. I was blown away by that, that he worked when he felt moved. And they gave jobs to everyone. Keith would meet kids on the street and ask them to come stretch his canvases for him. Basquiat had every B-boy and every graffiti artist in his loft. He was constantly giving everything away. I think they felt guilty that they became successful and were surrounded by people who were penniless, so they shared what they had. They were incredibly generous people, and that rubbed off on me. You stay inspired that way. I could never work in a recording studio where you have this lovely view and a beach and the waves are crashing. For me, it’s all about being in a tiny room with little windows. It’s almost like you have to be in a prison. And you can create beauty when you’re in that sort of deprived environment, which is a re-creation of your formative years.”

“I remember having conversations with Keith [Haring] and with Basquiat about the importance of your art being accessible to people,“ she recalled. “That was their big thing—it should be available to everyone. It was so important for Keith to be able to draw on subways and walls. And Basquiat used to say to me, ‘You’re so lucky that you make music, because music comes out of radios everywhere.’ He thought that what I did was more pop, more connected to pop culture than what he did. Little did he know that his art would become pop culture. But it’s not like we really had discussions about the meaning of art. I remember hearing them talk about those things.”

(Interview Magazine, December 2014)