Category: ac/dc

On this day in music history: May 14, 1976 – &…

On this day in music history: May 14, 1976 – “High Voltage” by AC/DC is released. Produced by Harry Vanda and George Young, it is recorded at Albert Studios in Sydney, Australia from Late 1974 – Early 1975. The album is the bands’ first to be released outside of their native Australia, and contains tracks from their first two Australian albums “High Voltage” and “T.N.T.”. The original Australian-only release features a noticeably different track listing and different cover artwork to the internationally released version. The international release contains only two tracks from the original Australian version, with the other tracks being taken from the “T.N.T.” album. It include the hits “It’s A Long Way To The Top (If You Wanna Rock ‘N’ Roll)”, and “T.N.T.”. Originally released in the US on Atlantic Records’ Atco imprint, “Voltage” only peaks at number one hundred forty six on the Billboard Top 200, but over time it become one of the bands most popular and best loved albums. The song is also prominently featured at the end of the comedy “School Of Rock”, when it is performed by the students and actor Jack Black. Remastered and reissued on CD in 1994, it is remastered again in 2003, also re-releasing the album on vinyl when AC/DC move their catalog from Atlantic to Sony Music’s Epic Records. “High Voltage” is cerified 3x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: December 17, 197…

On this day in music history: December 17, 1976 – “Dirty Deeds Done Dirty Cheap”, the third album by AC/DC is released internationally. Produced by Harry Vanda and George Young, it is recorded at Albert Studios in Sydney, Australia from December 1975 – March 1976. Even before releasing their second album “High Voltage” in April of 1976, AC/DC begin recording their third release. The band originally record several songs in the UK for an EP release, but are scrapped and they start over again when they return home. All the material on is written by Angus and Malcolm Young along with lead singer Bon Scott. The sessions yield a number of songs including “Carry Me Home”, “I’m A Rebel” and “Dirty Eyes” which are regulated to the vault and remain unreleased. “Eyes” is eventually re-tooled and surfaces as “Whole Lotta Rosie” on AC/DC’s “Let There Be Rock” album in 1977. The album cover featuring a composite of several people, standing in a motel parking lot with black bars over their eyes to mask their identity, is designed by the famed UK graphics art firm Hipgnosis. When the original Australian edition is released in September of 1976, it features nine songs including “Jailbreak” and “R.I.P. (Rock in Peace)”. The international version removes those and replaces them with “Love At First Feel” and “Rocker”. The Australian release also features longer versions of the title track and “Big Balls” which are shortened or faded earlier on the international release. “Rocker” first appears on the Australian release of “T.N.T.”, but is added to the international version of “Dirty Deeds”. Even with the shifted track order and substitutions, AC/DC’s US label Atlantic Records rejects “Dirty Deeds Done Dirty Cheap” even after having issued “High Voltage” only eight months earlier. Atlantic opts not to release it based on the performances and material, feeling that it was “too raw and gritty for American radio”. It goes unreleased for nearly five years after brisk sales as an import, Atlantic finally releases it in April of 1981, following the huge success of “Back In Black”, and fourteen months after the death of Bon Scott. Later, UK Atlantic executive Phil Carson admits that not releasing the album in the US for years was “one of the most crass decisions ever made by a record company executive”. Several songs become major fan favorites and radio airplay staples including “Problem Child”, the risque and double entendre laden “Big Balls” (#26 Mainstream Rock) and the title track (#4 Mainstream Rock). In spite of its belated American release, it becomes AC/DC’s third best selling album behind “Highway To Hell” and “Back In Black”. The album is remastered and reissued on CD in 1994 and 2003. It is reissued as a 180 gram vinyl LP in 2009 when the band license their catalog to Sony Music. “Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap” peaks at number three on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 6x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: November 23, 198…

On this day in music history: November 23, 1981 – “For Those About To Rock We Salute You”, the eighth album by AC/DC is released. Produced by Robert John “Mutt” Lange, it is recorded at Mobile One at: H.I.S. Studio and Family Studio in Paris, France from Spring – Autumn 1981. Issued as AC/DC’s official follow up to “Back In Black” (proceeded in the US by the belated release of their 1976 album “Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap” (#3 US Top 200) in March of 1981), the album is recorded at the bands’ rehearsal space located in an abandoned factory outside of Paris, France. Working once again with producer “Mutt” Lange, recording takes place there when they are dissatisfied with the sound they get in a proper recording studio. The albums’ title is inspired by a book read by guitarist Angus Young titled “For Those About To Die, We Salute You”, about Roman gladiators. It spins off two singles including “Let’s Get It Up” and the title track. Original vinyl LP pressings feature the artist name, title and artwork embossed on the front of the gatefold sleeve. The track “Snowballed” (also issued as the B-side of “Let’s Get It Up”) is later heard in the film “Sixteen Candles”. The album is most recently remastered and reissued on CD in 2004 (with enhanced content). It is also reissued as a 180 LP in 2009. “For Those About To Rock We Salute You” spends three weeks at number one on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 3x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: July 27, 1979 – …

On this day in music history: July 27, 1979 – “Highway To Hell”, the sixth album by AC/DC is released. Produced by Robert John “Mutt” Lange, it is recorded at Criteria Studios in Miami, FL and Roundhouse Studios in London from February – April 1979. When production on the album begins, the band start off working with veteran producer/engineer Eddie Kramer, who is fired after recording one track with them. South African born producer “Mutt” Lange is brought in as his replacement. The end result of this collaboration is first of three highly successful albums with Lange, and is the bands breakthrough album in the US, featuring several tracks that become rock radio staples and mainstays of the bands live performances including “Shot Down In Flames”, “Girls Got Rhythm”, “If You Want Blood (You’ve Got It)”, and the title track. “Highway To Hell” is also the last AC/DC album to feature original lead singer Bon Scott who passes away from acute alcohol consumption in February 1980. Originally issued on CD in the late 80’s, it is remastered and reissued again in 1994, then again in 2003 when Sony Music becomes the licensee of AC/DC’s catalog. It is also reissued on 180 gram vinyl the same year, making the LP pressing available for the first time since 1989. “Highway To Hell” peaks at number seventeen on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 7x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: July 25, 1980 – …

On this day in music history: July 25, 1980 – “Back In Black”, the sixth album by AC/DC is released. Produced by Robert John “Mutt” Lange, it is recorded at Compass Point Studios in Nassau, Bahamas and Electric Lady Studios in New York City from April – May 1980. Following the major success of their previous album “Highway To Hell”, AC/DC are beset by tragedy when lead singer Bon Scott dies suddenly and unexpectedly of acute alcohol poisoning on February 19, 1980. Faced with the difficult decision of whether to continue or break up the band, with the blessing of Scott’s parents, AC/DC decides to soldier on, recruiting former Geordie lead vocalist Brian Johnson as their new singer. Working once again with South African born producer “Mutt” Lange, the band begin recording the album at Chris Blackwell’s (Island Records founder) studio in The Bahamas. Before sessions can begin, AC/DC suffer more setbacks as their equipment is held up in customs for a time before being released. Once in the studio, there are more problems,  as tropical storms pelting the island make electricity unreliable, sometimes losing power for days at a time. Initially anxious about how fans will receive the new album and new singer Johnson, the publics’ reaction is overwhelmingly positive. Several songs become rock radio staples, including “You Shook Me All Night Long”, “Hells Bells” and the title track. The original vinyl LP release of the album features the bands logo and title embossed on the front cover. “Black” becomes the Australian hard rock band’s biggest selling album ever, becoming the sixth best selling album of all time in the US. The album is first remastered and reissued on CD in 1995, then remastered again in 2003, also being reissued as a 180 gram vinyl LP. “Back In Black” peaks at number four on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 22x Platinum in the US by the RIAA, receiving a Double Diamond certification.

On this day in music history: May 14, 1976 – &…

On this day in music history: May 14, 1976 – “High Voltage” by AC/DC is released. Produced by Harry Vanda and George Young, it is recorded at Albert Studios in Sydney, Australia from Late 1974 – Early 1975. The album is the bands’ first to be released outside of their native Australia, and contains tracks from their first two Australian albums “High Voltage” and “T.N.T.”. The original Australian-only release features a noticeably different track listing and different cover artwork to the internationally released version. The international release contains only two tracks from the original Australian version, with the other tracks being taken from the “T.N.T.” album. It include the hits “It’s A Long Way To The Top (If You Wanna Rock ‘N’ Roll)”, and “T.N.T.”. Originally released in the US on Atlantic Records’ Atco imprint, “Voltage” only peaks at number one hundred forty six on the Billboard Top 200, but over time it become one of the bands most popular and best loved albums. The song is also prominently featured at the end of the comedy “School Of Rock”, when it is performed by the students and actor Jack Black. Remastered and reissued on CD in 1994, it is remastered again in 2003, also re-releasing the album on vinyl when AC/DC move their catalog from Atlantic to Sony Music’s Epic Records. “High Voltage” is cerified 3x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

Remembering AC/DC lead vocalist Bon Scott (bor…

Remembering AC/DC lead vocalist Bon Scott (born Ronald Belford Scott in Forfar, Angus, Scotland, UK) – July 9, 1946 – February 19, 1980

On this day in music history: December 17, 197…

On this day in music history: December 17, 1976 – “Dirty Deeds Done Dirty Cheap”, the third album by AC/DC is released internationally. Produced by Harry Vanda and George Young, it is recorded at Albert Studios in Sydney, Australia from December 1975 – March 1976. Even before releasing their second album “High Voltage” in April of 1976, AC/DC begin recording their third release. The band originally record several songs in the UK for an EP release, but are scrapped and they start over again when they return home. All the material on is written by Angus and Malcolm Young along with lead singer Bon Scott. The sessions yield a number of songs including “Carry Me Home”, “I’m A Rebel” and “Dirty Eyes” which are regulated to the vault and remain unreleased. “Eyes” is eventually re-tooled and surfaces as “Whole Lotta Rosie” on AC/DC’s “Let There Be Rock” album in 1977. The album cover featuring a composite of several people, standing in a motel parking lot with black bars over their eyes to mask their identity, is designed by the famed UK graphics art firm Hipgnosis. When the original Australian edition is released in September of 1976, it features nine songs including “Jailbreak” and “R.I.P. (Rock in Peace)”. The international version removes those and replaces them with “Love At First Feel” and “Rocker”. The Australian release also features longer versions of the title track and “Big Balls” which are shortened or faded earlier on the international release. “Rocker” first appears on the Australian release of “T.N.T.”, but is added to the international version of “Dirty Deeds”. Even with the shifted track order and substitutions, AC/DC’s US label Atlantic Records rejects “Dirty Deeds Done Dirty Cheap” even after having issued “High Voltage” only eight months earlier. Atlantic opts not to release it based on the performances and material, feeling that it was “too raw and gritty for American radio”. It goes unreleased for nearly five years after brisk sales as an import, Atlantic finally releases it in April of 1981, following the huge success of “Back In Black”, and fourteen months after the death of Bon Scott. Later, UK Atlantic executive Phil Carson admits that not releasing the album in the US for years was “one of the most crass decisions ever made by a record company executive”. Several songs become major fan favorites and radio airplay staples including “Problem Child”, the risque and double entendre laden “Big Balls” (#26 Mainstream Rock) and the title track (#4 Mainstream Rock). In spite of its belated American release, it becomes AC/DC’s third best selling album behind “Highway To Hell” and “Back In Black”. The album is remastered and reissued on CD in 1994 and 2003. It is reissued as a 180 gram vinyl LP in 2009 when the band license their catalog to Sony Music. “Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap” peaks at number three on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 6x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: November 23, 198…

On this day in music history: November 23, 1981 – “For Those About To Rock We Salute You”, the eighth album by AC/DC is released. Produced by Robert John “Mutt” Lange, it is recorded at Mobile One at: H.I.S. Studio and Family Studio in Paris, France from Spring – Autumn 1981. Issued as AC/DC’s official follow up to “Back In Black” (proceeded in the US by the belated release of their 1976 album “Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap” (#3 US Top 200) in March of 1981), the album is recorded at the bands’ rehearsal space located in an abandoned factory outside of Paris, France. Working once again with producer “Mutt” Lange, recording takes place there when they are dissatisfied with the sound they get in a proper recording studio. The albums’ title is inspired by a book read by guitarist Angus Young titled “For Those About To Die, We Salute You”, about Roman gladiators. It spins off two singles including “Let’s Get It Up” and the title track. Original vinyl LP pressings feature the artist name, title and artwork embossed on the front of the gatefold sleeve.

The track “Snowballed” (also issued as the B-side of “Let’s Get It Up”) is later heard in the film “Sixteen Candles”.

“For Those About To Rock We Salute You” spends three weeks at number one on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 3x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

Rhythm guitarist and AC/DC co-founder Malcolm Young (born…

Rhythm guitarist and AC/DC co-founder Malcolm Young (born Malcolm Mitchell Young in Glasgow, Scotland) – January 6, 1953 – November 18, 2017, RIP