On this day in music history: October 9, 1965 …

On this day in music history: October 9, 1965 – “Yesterday” by The Beatles hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 4 weeks. Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney, it is the tenth US chart topper for “The Fab Four”. The song is actually written entirely by Paul McCartney, but is credited to “Lennon/McCartney” as are all original Beatles compositions written by John or Paul. The melody comes to McCartney in a dream while he is living at his girlfriend Jane Asher’s family home in London. Waking up and quickly going to the piano, he begins playing the melody to avoid forgetting it. Initially dubbing the song “Scrambled Eggs”, he quickly improvises temporary lyrics to further embed it into his memory. They read “scrambled eggs, oh, my baby how I love your legs”. Then for the next couple of weeks, Paul plays the song for others asking them if they had ever heard it before when he thinks he may have subconsciously plagiarized it from another song. When he realizes he hasn’t he finishes writing it during the Spring of 1965. Playing the finished composition for producer George Martin, both agree that a traditional band arrangement does not work for the song. Martin suggests that McCartney record it by himself with just an acoustic guitar, scoring it with a string quartet. The track is recorded on June 14, 1965 at Abbey Road Studios in Studio Two, with the master version being completed in two takes. Three days later, the strings are overdubbed on to the track. Originally issued on the non-soundtrack side of “Help!” in the UK, Capitol Records in the US withholds the song from the album for a stand alone single release (b/w “Act Naturally”) releasing it on September 13, 1965. McCartney performs “Yesterday” on The Beatles fourth and final appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show airing on September 12, 1965 (though taped one month earlier on August 14, 1965). Entering the Hot 100 at #45 on September 25, 1965, it leaps to the top of the chart two weeks later.  However it is not issued in the UK on a 45 until 1976. “Yesterday” goes on to become one of the most covered pop songs in history with over 2,200 recorded versions, earning it a place in the Guinness World Book Of Records. Since its release in 1965, The Beatles version of yesterday has been broadcast on US radio over seven million times, putting it in third place behind The Association’s “Never My Love” and The Righteous Brothers’ “You’ve Lost That Loving Feeling”. The Beatles recording is inducted into the Grammy Hall Of Fame in 1997. “Yesterday” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.