On this day in music history: May 13, 1974 – &…

On this day in music history: May 13, 1974 – “Body Heat”, the twenty third studio album by Quincy Jones is released. Produced by Quincy Jones and Ray Brown, it is recorded at Westlake Audio in Los Angeles, CA from January – April 1974. Continuing his breakneck pace of producing film and TV scores, as well as his own albums, Quincy Jones charges ahead. With “You’ve Got It Bad Girl” still on the charts, Jones works on the follow up in early 1974. “Q” brings together veteran jazz and R&B players, along with relative newcomers. That group includes Herbie Hancock, Dave Grusin, Bob James, Richard Tee (keyboards), Bob Margouleff, Malcolm Cecil (synthesizers), Grady Tate, Paul Humphrey, Bernard Purdie, James Gadson (drums), Wah Wah Watson, Phil Upchurch, David T. Walker, Arthur Adams, Dennis Coffey, Eric Gale (guitar), Max Bennett, Chuck Rainey, Melvin Dunlap (bass), Hubert Laws (flute), Frank Rosolino (trombone), Clifford Solomon, Chuck Findley (trumpets), Jerome Richardson, Pete Christlieb (saxophones), Bobbye Hall (percussion), and Leon Ware, Minnie Riperton, Myrna Matthews, Al Jarreau, Jesse Kirkland, Carolyn Willis, Benard Ighner, Bruce Fisher, Jim Gilstrap, Joseph Greene, Tom Bahler (vocals). Straddling the line between jazz and R&B since “Gula Matari”, Jones makes his first real move toward mainstream R&B with “Body Heat”. That transition is most obvious in the sensual title track (#85 R&B), sung by Leon Ware (“I Want You”, “Inside My Love”) and Bruce Fisher. Ware is also featured with then Wonderlove backing vocalist (and soon to be a star in her own right) Minnie Riperton on “If I Ever Lose This Heaven” (#71 R&B). The album becomes Quincy Jones’ most successful to date. It marks a major turning point in Jones’ career, beginning a string of highly successful and award winning albums. It’s nearly his last also, when near tragedy strikes only three months after it is released. Newly married to actress Peggy Lipton (“The Mod Squad”) and the father of then new baby daughter Kidada, Jones suffers an aneurysm that ruptures while he’s lying in bed with his wife. Though he is quickly raced into emergency surgery to repair the burst blood vessel, it is also discovered he has another aneurysm that has to be operated on. Given only a minimal chance of surviving the second surgery, his friends hold a “memorial service” for him while awaiting the procedure. Miraculously, “Q” survives the second surgery, though is told by doctors he can no longer play the trumpet due to the pressure playing the instrument puts on his frontal lobe. Also remixed and released as a quadraphonic stereo LP and 8-track tape, “Heat” makes its CD debut in 1986. It is remastered and reissued in Japan in 2012, with a high resolution SHM-CD being issued in 2016. “Body Heat” spends fourteen weeks at number one on the Billboard Jazz album chart, one week at number one on the R&B album chart, number six on the Top 200, and is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.