https://youtu.be/0KCvVsNstjE

https://youtu.be/0KCvVsNstjE

U Can’t Hurry Love https://youtu.be/1qOiNnK7AF…

U Can’t Hurry Love
https://youtu.be/1qOiNnK7AFg

On this day in music history: July 19, 1986 – …

On this day in music history: July 19, 1986 – “Rumors” by the Timex Social Club hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for 2 weeks, also peaking at #8 on the Hot 100 on August 16, 1986. Written by Marcus Thompson, Michael Marshall and Alex Hill, it is the biggest hit for the Berkeley, CA based R&B band fronted by lead singer Michael Marshall. While still students at Berkeley High School in 1984, the group record a demo version of the song that receives airplay on UC Berkeley’s campus radio station KALX. A short while later, local entrepreneur Jay King hears their demo and seek them out. Initially, King tries to convince the band Con Funk Shun to record the song, but lead singer Michael Cooper turns it down. King raises the money to take TSC into the studio to record a fully produced version themselves. The track is recorded in January of 1986 at Starlight Studios in Richmond, CA. After receiving rejections from every major record company in the US, King releases the single on his own Jay Records imprint, securing pressing and distribution with L.A. based indie distributor Macola Records. Initially released only as 12" single in February of 1986, King and the group initially sell copies of the record out of the trunks of their cars to local record stores in CA, and other areas where there is buzz on the single. The record takes off nationally after a radio station in Texas puts it in heavy rotation. “Rumors” also becomes a hit internationally when it is picked up for distribution by Mercury Records outside the US. The sales and chart success of “Rumors” in the US is significant, as it is one of the last times that an independently recorded and distributed record hits the top ten on the US pop and R&B singles charts. During the time that “Rumors” is on the charts, KDAY DJ Russ Parr “aka Bobby Jimmy & The Critters” releases the comedy parody  single “Roaches”, released by Macola Records, the same distributor of the Timex Social Club record.

On this day in music history: July 19, 1986 – …

On this day in music history: July 19, 1986 – “Invisible Touch” by Genesis hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 1 week. Written by Tony Banks, Phil Collins and Mike Rutherford, it is the biggest hit for the progressive rock band from Godalming, Surrey, UK. While his third solo album “No Jacket Required” is still riding high in the charts, Phil Collins re-joins his Genesis band mates keyboardist Tony Banks and guitarist/bassist Mike Rutherford in the Fall of 1985 to begin work on the follow up to their previous album “Genesis”, released two years earlier. Recording at their studio The Farm in Chiddingfold, Surrey, the idea for what will become “Invisible Touch”, evolves out of an in studio jam session while the band are working on the track “The Last Domino”. Rutherford begins playing the songs signature riff as Collins improvises the line “she seems to have an invisible touch”. Realizing they’re on to something, they begin crafting a song around those parts. The trio agree that it is a hit, deciding that it not only will it be the title track of their next album, but be released as its first single. Issued on May 19, 1986, “Invisible Touch” is an immediate smash. Entering the Hot 100 at #45 on May 31, 1986, it climbs to the top of the chart seven weeks later. The week that “Invisible Touch” tops the US singles charts, Genesis’ former lead singer Peter Gabriel move up to number two on the Hot 100 with “Sledgehammer”. It marks the first time in Billboard chart history that a band and one of its former members have held down the top two positions on the Hot 100. Gabriel succeeds Genesis at the top of the chart the following week on July 26, 1986, giving him his highest charting single in the US as well. “Touch” is also released with an extended 12" version, remixed by John “Tokes” Potoker (also having previously remixed Collins’ “Sussudio” and Gabriel’s “Sledgehammer”). In the UK, Virgin Records issues a limited edition 7" vinyl single of the song pressed on clear vinyl with custom labels, and packaged in a die cut fold out sleeve. “Invisible Touch” is the first of five consecutive top five singles to be released from the album, helping propel it to over 6x Platinum status in the US.

On this day in music history: July 19, 1986 – …

On this day in music history: July 19, 1986 – “Winner In You”, the eighth album by Patti LaBelle hits #1 on the Billboard Top 200 for 1 week, also topping the R&B album chart for 8 weeks beginning on June 14, 1986. Produced by Richard Perry, Burt Bacharach, Carole Bayer Sager, Howie Rice, Budd Ellison, Nick Johnson, Nickolas Ashford and Valerie Simpson, it is recorded at Conway Studios, Cello Studios, Studio 55, Bill Schnee Studio, Lion Share Studios, Baby ‘O’ Recorders, Rock Steady Recording Studios, One On One Studios, Westlake Audio in Los Angeles, CA and 39th Street Recording Studios in New York City from Mid 1984 – Late 1985. Following the success of the singles “New Attitude” and “Stir It Up” recorded for the “Beverly Hills Cop” soundtrack, the veteran R&B singer goes into the studio with a number of top producers to record the first album for her new label MCA Records. The label signs her just as her contract with Philadelphia International Records expires at the end of 1983, and her career is on the upswing, as her final album for the label “I’m In Love Again” spins off two hits with “If Only You Knew” (#1 R&B, #48 Pop) and “Love, Need & Want You” (#10 R&B). “Winner” is LaBelle’s most successful album, spinning off three singles including “On My Own (w/ Michael McDonald) (#1 Pop and R&B), "Kiss Away The Pain” (#13 R&B), and “Oh, People” (#7 R&B, #29 Pop). “Winner In You” is certified 2x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: July 19, 1982 – …

On this day in music history: July 19, 1982 – “Donna Summer”, the tenth studio album by Donna Summer is released. Produced by Quincy Jones, it is recorded at Westlake Audio, Allen Zentz Studios and Ocean Way Studios in Los Angeles, CA from December 1981 – May 1982. In the Fall of 1981, Geffen Records rejects “I’m A Rainbow”, an eighteen song double LP concept album, it is initially presented as Summer’s projected second full length release for the label. With Geffen deciding to shelve the ambitious project (until 1996), she instead collaborates with producer Quincy Jones. The sessions prove to be difficult as Summer is pregnant with her third child (daughter Amanda Grace Sudano) at the time. Suffering from morning sickness and fatigue throughout most of the sessions, she frequently clashes with Jones over the musical direction of the album. Jones invites numerous artists to contribute songs to the project including Bruce Springsteen, Rod Temperton and Michael Sembello. Label founder David Geffen approaches Springsteen’s manager Jon Landau about the musician writing a song for Donna. Springsteen agrees and initially writes “Cover Me” for Summer. However, Bruce’s manager feels the song is a potential hit for his client and convinces him to keep it for his own album. Springsteen ends up recording the song for himself and includes it on “Born In The USA”, and writes another song instead for Summer. He offers up the rocking “Protection”, of which he also plays guitar and sings background vocals on. The track earns Donna Summer a Grammy nomination for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance in 1983. It spins off three singles including “Love Is In Control (Finger On The Trigger)” (#10 Pop, #4 R&B) and “State Of Independence” (#41 Pop, #31 R&B), the latter of which includes an all star chorus that includes Michael Jackson, Lionel Richie, Stevie Wonder, James Ingram, Michael McDonald, Christopher Cross, Kenny Loggins, Brenda Russell, Dionne Warwick and many others. Originally released on CD in the mid 80’s, it is remastered and reissued in 1994 by Casablanca/Mercury Records. Regaining the rights to her albums originally released on Geffen, Summer’s catalog is remastered and reissued two years after her passing in 2014 on the Driven By The Music label, including her self titled album with seven additional bonus tracks.  "Donna Summer" peaks at number twenty on the Billboard Top 200, number six on the R&B album chart, and is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: July 19, 1980 – …

On this day in music history: July 19, 1980 – “It’s Still Rock & Roll To Me” by Billy Joel hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 2 weeks. Written by Billy Joel, it is the first chart topping single for the singer, songwriter and musician from Hicksville, Long Island, NY. The song is inspired by a conversation that Joel has with his publicist and manager over his image, and his unwillingness to change or conform to current trends. All of this is influential in the stylistic turn that Billy Joel takes with his seventh album “Glass Houses”. Featuring a more straight ahead rock sound than his previous work, it becomes one of his most successful and acclaimed works. Issued as the follow up to the albums first single “You May Be Right” (#7 Pop) in early May of 1980, “It’s Still Rock & Roll To Me” is a smash right out of the gate. Entering the Hot 100 at #38 on May 24, 1980, it climbs to the top the charts eight weeks later. The success of the single drives the “Glass Houses” album to over 5x Platinum status (as certified by the RIAA) in the US alone. The music video for the song, a performance clip features Joel singing a live vocal to the original track. “It’s Still Rock & Roll To Me” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: July 19, 1975 – …

On this day in music history: July 19, 1975 – “Fight The Power” by The Isley Brothers hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for 3 weeks, also peaking at #4 on the Hot 100 on September 27, 1975. Written by Ernie Isley, Marvin Isley, Chris Jasper, Ronald Isley, Rudolph Isley and O’Kelly Isley, it is the second R&B chart topper for the family band from Cincinnati, OH. Though credited to the entire band, the song is actually written almost entirely by guitarist Ernie Isley. The initial idea for the song comes to him while on a visit to Disneyland in Southern California. As he’s taking a shower, the lyrics to the first verse immediately come to him, forcing him to jump out of the shower to write it down before forgetting it. A short time later, the band cut the track at Kendun Recorders in Los Angeles. Older brother and lead singer Ronald Isley adds the crowning touch to the song by singing the word “bullsh*t” on the song instead of “nonsense” as it had been originally written. Part 2 of the commercial 45 also includes an awkward edit, cutting out the expletive by splicing in music from the songs intro. This version is also serviced to radio as well. Many stations that are unhappy with this edit make their own edits, often just bleeping out the offending word in the proper places. Issued as the first single from the bands twelfth studio album “The Heat Is On” in May of 1975, it is an immediate smash. “Fight The Power” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: July 19, 1975 – …

On this day in music history: July 19, 1975 – “Listen To What The Man Said” by Wings hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 1 week. Written and produced by Paul McCartney, it is the fourth US solo chart topper for the former Beatle. Following the huge critical and commercial success of “Band On The Run” during 1974, Paul McCartney once again looks for another change of locale to record the follow up. Prior to the sessions, guitarist Jimmy McCullough (formerly of Thunderclap Newman) and drummer Geoff Britton are added to Wings’ line up. The band begin recording the track at songwriter and producer Allen Toussaint’s Sea Saint Studios in New Orleans in early 1975. Unsatisfied with the initial results, they rework parts of the track at Wally Heider Studios in Los Angeles, CA. The single also features saxophonist Tom Scott and guitarist Dave Mason playing on the track. “Listen To What The Man Said” is the first single released from the bands fourth album “Venus And Mars” on May 16, 1975. Entering the Hot 100 at #65 on May 31, 1975, it climbs to the top of the chart seven weeks later. “Listen To What The Man Said” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: July 19, 1969 – …

On this day in music history: July 19, 1969 – “What Does It Take (To Win Your Love)” by Jr. Walker & The All Stars hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for 2 weeks, also peaking at #4 on the Hot 100 on August 9, 1969. Written by Johnny Bristol, Harvey Fuqua and Vernon Bullock, it is the second R&B chart topper for the Motown singer and saxophonist. The track is recorded in late 1968 at Motown’s Studio A in Detroit with members of The Funk Brothers sitting in for members of Walker’s band. The Originals (“Baby I’m For Real”) and The Andantes, provide the background vocals. “What Does It Take” is initially passed over for release in one of Motown’s Quality Control meetings in favor of another Jr. Walker song titled “Home Cookin’” (#19 R&B, #42 Pop). When that single is only moderately successful, “What Does It Take” is immediately pulled from the vault and is released on April 25, 1969. “What Does It Take (To Win Your Love)” takes off faster than any of Walker’s singles since “Shotgun” four years before, becoming his second million seller.