On this day in music history: June 26, 1982 – …

On this day in music history: June 26, 1982 – “Early In The Morning” by The Gap Band hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for 3 weeks, also peaking at #24 on the the Hot 100 on July 24, 1982. Written by Charlie Wilson, Lonnie Simmons and Rudy Taylor, it is the second chart topping single for the R&B band from Tulsa, OK. Feeling the pressure to repeat the success of their previous album (“Gap Band III” with the chart topping “Burn Rubber On Me”), lead singer Charlie Wilson walks out of the studio in the middle of cutting vocals on the song in frustration. He returns soon after to complete his work on the song. Producer Lonnie Simmons will also take an equally perfectionist attitude, repeatedly mixing and re-editing the track until it is perfect. Issued as the first single released from the bands’ sixth studio album “Gap Band IV”, “Early In The Morning” is also The Gap Band’s first US top 40 pop single. Singer Robert Palmer also records a cover version of the song, peaking at #19 on the Hot 100 in December of 1988.

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Born on this day: June 26, 1961 – Singer and a…

Born on this day: June 26, 1961 – Singer and actress Terri Nunn of Berlin (born Terri Kathleen Nunn in Baldwin Hills, CA). Happy 58th Birthday, Terri!!

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Born on this day: June 26, 1956 – Singer, song…

Born on this day: June 26, 1956 – Singer, songwriter, musician and actor Chris Isaak (born Christopher Joseph Isaak in Stockton, CA). Happy 63rd Birthday, Chris!!

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On this day in music history: June 26, 1977 – …

On this day in music history: June 26, 1977 – Elvis Presley makes his final live concert appearance at the Market Square Arena in Indianapolis, IN. Performing before an audience of over 18,000 fans, the forty two year old rock & roll legend looking like a shadow of his former self, appearing significantly overweight, looking pale and weak. Numerous health issues including high blood pressure, glaucoma, and liver damage aggravated by his prescription drug abuse and excessive overeating have caught up with him. Sweating profusely and often forgetting the words to songs that he has performed live for many years, he concludes his seventy three minute set with “Can’t Help Falling In Love” before leaving the stage. The concert is filmed in its entirety, though much of the footage has not been widely seen by the public to this day.

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Born on this day: June 26, 1955 – Guitarist, v…

Born on this day: June 26, 1955 – Guitarist, vocalist, songwriter and producer Mick Jones (born Michael Geoffrey Jones in Wandsworth, London, UK) of The Clash and Big Audio Dynamite. Happy 64th Birthday, Mick!!!

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On this day in music history: June 26, 1965 – …

On this day in music history: June 26, 1965 – “Mr. Tambourine Man” by The Byrds hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 1 week. Written by Bob Dylan, it is the first chart topping single for the Los Angeles, CA based folk-rock band. The hit single version of the song is actually the second version cut by the band, having previously recorded it in mid 1964. Producer Terry Melcher (son of actress/singer Doris Day) is initially unsure of the entire bands’ musicianship and hire members of The Wrecking Crew including Leon Russell, Glen Campbell, Hal Blaine, and Larry Knechtel to play along side Roger McGuinn (12-string electric guitar). McGuinn, Gene Clark and David Crosby sing on the track, recorded at Columbia Studios in Los Angeles, CA on January 20, 1965. Entering the Hot 100 at #87 on May 15, 1965, it leaps to the top of the chart six weeks later. “Mr. Tambourine Man” is also a huge hit on the other side of the Atlantic, hitting #1 on the UK singles chart. The Byrds sound make them pioneers of the burgeoning folk-rock movement, becoming highly influential with many acts that follow (We Five, The Mamas And The Papas, The Lovin’ Spoonful, The Turtles, The Grass Roots, Barry McGuire, Simon & Garfunkel) scoring hits reminiscent of or directly mimicking them. The Byrds version of “Mr. Tambourine Man” is inducted into the Grammy Hall Of Fame in 1998.

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On this day in music history: June 26, 1964 – …

On this day in music history: June 26, 1964 – “A Hard Day’s Night”, the third studio album by The Beatles is released (UK release date is on July 10, 1964). Produced by George Martin, it is recorded at EMI Pathe Marconi Studios in Paris, France and Abbey Road Studios in London from January 29, 1964, February 25 – 27, 1964, and March 1 – June 4, 1964. During their initial rush of Beatlemania in the UK, The Beatles receive an offer from United Artists Pictures to make a film. The film company’s motivation is to make a quick, low budget film so that it has the rights to release an accompanying soundtrack album. In spite of this, the project is an inspired collaboration between The Beatles and director Richard Lester. When the band begins work on the music prior to the start of filming, they once again demonstrate another leap forward in their musical development. It is the first Beatles album to feature all original songs written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. The title track is one of the last songs written and recorded for the film, inspired by a statement made by drummer Ringo Starr, exclaiming “that was a hard day’s night, that was!”, after an exhaustive day of filming. Lennon and McCartney write the song overnight, and play it for film producer Walter Shenson the next day. The song is also selected to be the film’s title (the working title had been “Beatlemania”). The soundtrack album is released in the US ten days before the film’s world premiere in London on July 6, 1964. The US version of the album differs significantly from its UK counterpart. The UK version features the seven songs included in the film, and an additional six that make up side two. Aside from featuring different cover artwork, the US LP features the seven songs used in the film along with “I’ll Cry Instead”. The other four songs (“When I Get Home”, “Things We Said Today”, “I’ll Be Back”, “Any Time At All”), are replaced by instrumental versions of “I Should Have Known Better”, “Ringo’s Theme (This Boy)”, “And I Love Her”, and “A Hard Day’s Night” scored and conducted by George Martin. Like the film itself, the soundtrack will be a runaway success, spinning off a total of four singles (including the previously released “Can’t Buy Me Love” (#1 Pop), and the title track (#1 Pop). The rights to the US version of the soundtrack revert to Capitol Records after the demise of United Artists Records in 1980. That version is deleted in 1987, when the original UK version is finally issued in the US. In January of 2014, the original US soundtrack is reissued on CD (in a CD sized replica of the original LP package) individually and as part of the box set “The Beatles – The US Albums”. “A Hard Day’s Night” spends fourteen weeks at number one on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 4x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: June 26, 1961 – …

On this day in music history: June 26, 1961 – “Quarter To Three” by Gary “U.S.” Bonds hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 2 weeks. Written by Gene Barge, Frank Guida, Gary Anderson and Joe Royster, it is the biggest hit for the Norfolk, VA based R&B singer born Gary Anderson. The song originates as an instrumental titled “A Night With Daddy G” by the band The Church Street Five. Following the success of Gary “U.S.” Bonds first major hit “New Orleans”, the singer is partying and jamming in the studio with label mates The Church Street Five. Bonds begins improvising lyrics to the instrumental. Somewhere during the course of this jam session, the singer hits record on the studio tape machine, capturing the performance. Released on the small indie label LeGrand Records out of Norfolk, VA, the record becomes an immediate party anthem, thanks in part to the popularity of the dance “The Pony”. Entering the Hot 100 at #99 on May 22, 1961, it rockets to the top of the chart five weeks later. In the wake of “Quarter To Three”, Gary “U.S.” Bonds scores a string of hits including three more Top 10 singles (“School Is Out” (#5 Pop), “Dear Lady Twist” (#9 Pop), “Twist, Twist Senora” (#9 Pop) ) through 1962. After a two decade long dry spell, Bonds makes a surprise comeback when he reaches the Top 20 with the Bruce Springsteen penned and co-produced single “This Little Girl” (#11 Pop) on June 20, 1981, one week shy of twenty years after topping the Hot 100. “Quarter To Three” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

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twixnmix: Michelle Phillips and Jack Nicholson…

twixnmix:

Michelle Phillips and Jack Nicholson during the 43rd Annual Academy Awards Governer’s Ball at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on April 15, 1971.

twixnmix:Halle Berry and Eric Benet during H…

twixnmix:

Halle Berry and Eric Benet during

HBO Golden Globes After Party

on January 23, 2000. She won Best Actress for her portrayal of Dorothy Dandridge in “Introducing Dorothy Dandridge” (1999).